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Neonatal oxygen exposure leads to increased aortic wall stiffness in adult rats: a Doppler ultrasound study

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  21 April 2011

Y. Mivelaz
Affiliation:
Division of Cardiology, Department of Paediatrics, Centre de recherche, CHU Sainte-Justine, Université de Montréal, Montréal, Québec, Canada
C. Yzydorczyk
Affiliation:
Division of Neonatology, Department of Paediatrics, Centre de recherche, CHU Sainte-Justine, Université de Montréal, Montréal, Québec, Canada
A. Barbier
Affiliation:
Division of Neonatology, Department of Paediatrics, Centre de recherche, CHU Sainte-Justine, Université de Montréal, Montréal, Québec, Canada
A. Cloutier
Affiliation:
Division of Neonatology, Department of Paediatrics, Centre de recherche, CHU Sainte-Justine, Université de Montréal, Montréal, Québec, Canada
J. C. Fouron
Affiliation:
Division of Cardiology, Department of Paediatrics, Centre de recherche, CHU Sainte-Justine, Université de Montréal, Montréal, Québec, Canada
D. de Blois
Affiliation:
Faculty of Pharmacy, Université de Montréal, Montréal, Québec, Canada
A. M. Nuyt*
Affiliation:
Division of Neonatology, Department of Paediatrics, Centre de recherche, CHU Sainte-Justine, Université de Montréal, Montréal, Québec, Canada
*
*Address for correspondence: A. M. Nuyt, MD, Centre de recherche, CHU Sainte-Justine, Department of Pediatrics, Université de Montréal, 3175, chemin de la Côte Sainte-Catherine, Montréal H3 T 1C5, Québec, Canada. (Email anne-monique.nuyt@recherche-ste-justine.qc.ca)

Abstract

We have previously shown that neonatal high oxygen (O2) exposure in rats leads to hypertension and vascular dysfunction in adulthood. Pulse-wave velocity (PWV), an indirect measure of vascular biophysical properties (arterial stiffness or distensibility), is a sensitive marker of cardiovascular health. Its measurement in rats is mostly based on invasive hemodynamics measurements, prohibiting longitudinal studies particularly relevant in models of developmental programming of cardiovascular dysfunctions. With this study, we sought (1) to verify the feasibility and validity of measuring of aortic PWV in Sprague–Dawley rats by ultrasound; (2) to use the technique to compare aortic PWV in adult rats exposed to O2 as newborns (80% day 3–10 of life) v. controls; and (3) to develop an algorithm to calculate PWV in a non-invasive manner. We calculated aortic PWV using standard echocardiography and electrocardiogram, and validated the measures with PWV obtained by intraaortic catheters. Aortic full length was measured at sacrifice. PWV was significantly increased in O2 exposed (505 ± 18 cm/s) v. control animals (421 ± 17 cm/s, P < 0.01). With regard to weight, femur length and distance from the manubrium to the anal margin (MA length), the latter showed the best correlation (R = 0.84, P < 0.0001) with full aorta length derived from (L) = 0.339 × (MA length) + 4.281. The current data using echo-Doppler method demonstrated increased aortic stiffness in adult rats exposed to hyperoxia as newborns and suggests that non-invasive longitudinal studies of aortic PWV can be performed using the proposed algorithm for estimation of the full aorta length.

Type
Original Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press and the International Society for Developmental Origins of Health and Disease 2011

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