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A rare cause of Horner syndrome

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  06 January 2010

D Costello*
Affiliation:
Department of ENT, John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford, UK
J Salmon
Affiliation:
Department of Ophthalmology, John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford, UK
C Milford
Affiliation:
Department of ENT, John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford, UK
P Pretorius
Affiliation:
Department of Neuroradiology, John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford, UK
*
Address for correspondence: Mr Declan Costello, 51 Stapleton Road, Oxford OX3 7LX, UK. E-mail: declancostello@doctors.org.uk

Abstract

Objectives:

To demonstrate the importance of thorough investigation of patients with Horner syndrome, and to explain the relevant anatomy.

Case report:

A 46-year-old man presented with right-sided Horner syndrome. No other abnormality was found. Magnetic resonance imaging showed calcification of the stylohyoid ligament, with a pseudoarthrosis in the mid-portion of the ligament. This pseudoarthrosis was displacing and compressing the internal carotid artery and the adjacent sympathetic chain, causing Horner syndrome.

Conclusion:

In this case, magnetic resonance imaging was invaluable in elucidating the cause of the Horner syndrome. This is the first described case of pseudoarthrosis of a calcified stylohyoid ligament causing Horner syndrome.

Type
Clinical Records
Copyright
Copyright © JLO (1984) Limited 2010

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References

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