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Food Marketing to — and Research on — Children: New Directions for Regulation in the United States

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  18 November 2022

Jennifer L. Pomeranz
Affiliation:
NEW YORK UNIVERSITY, NEW YORK, NY, USA
Dariush Mozaffarian
Affiliation:
TUFTS UNIVERSITY, MEDFORD, MA, USA

Abstract

As countries around the world work to restrict unhealthy food and beverage marketing to children, the U.S. remains reliant on industry-self regulation. The First Amendment’s protection for commercial speech and previous gutting of the Federal Trade Commission’s authority pose barriers to restricting food marketing to children. However, false, unfair, and deceptive acts and practices remain subject to regulation and provide an avenue to address marketing to young children, modern practices that have evaded regulation, and gaps in the food and beverage industry’s self-regulatory approach.

Type
Independent Articles
Copyright
© 2022 The Author(s)

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