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Bismuth Nanowires for Potential Applications in Nanoscale Electronics Technology

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  28 March 2002

Stephen B. Cronin
Affiliation:
Department of Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
Yu-Ming Lin
Affiliation:
Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
Oded Rabin
Affiliation:
Department of Chemistry, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
Marcie R. Black
Affiliation:
Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
Gene Dresselhaus
Affiliation:
Francis Bitter Magnet Laboratory, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
Mildred S. Dresselhaus
Affiliation:
Department of Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
Pratibha L. Gai
Affiliation:
DuPont, Central Research and Development, Experimental Station, Wilmington, DE 19880-0356, USA University of Delaware, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Newark, DE 19716, USA
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Abstract

Nanowires of bismuth with diameters ranging from 10 to 200 nm and lengths of 50 μm have been synthesized by a pressure injection method. Nanostructural and chemical compositional studies using environmental and high resolution transmission electron microscopy with electron stimulated energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy have revealed essentially single crystal nanowires. The high resolution studies have shown that the nanowires contain amorphous Bi-oxide layers of a few nanometers on the surface. In situ environmental high resolution transmission electron microscopy (environmental-HRTEM) studies at the atomic level, in controlled hydrogen and other reducing gas environments at high temperatures demonstrate that gas reduction can be successfully applied to remove the oxide nanolayers and to maintain the dimensional and structural uniformity of the nanowires, which is key to attaining low electrical contact resistance.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
© 2002 Microscopy Society of America

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