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Magnetic Imaging on the Nanometer Scale Using Low-Temperature Scanning Probe Techniques

  • M. Zech (a1), C. Boedefeld (a1), F. Otto (a1) and D. Andres (a1)
Extract

Multiple techniques now exist for the investigation of nanoscale magnetic properties, extending from Lorentz microscopy and magneto-optical imaging (MOKE) to scanning probe microscopy approaches (see Figure 1 for an overview). Among the latter, the most widely used techniques offering both high spatial and high magnetic-field resolution are magnetic force microscopy (MFM) and scanning Hall probe microscopy (SHPM). Both techniques are well known for their versatility and ease of use and can be further adapted for operation in cryogenic conditions. This property is crucial for all areas of research where high magnetic fields are required and where the influence of thermal energy/broadening needs to be suppressed. For example, much of today's fundamental research on superconductivity, spintronics, and magnetic data storage is taking place at low temperatures.

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Corresponding author
martin.zech@attocube.com
References
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Microscopy Today
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