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The walentaite group and the description of a new member, alcantarillaite, from the Alcantarilla mine, Belalcázar, Córdoba, Andalusia, Spain.

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  18 March 2020

Ian E. Grey
Affiliation:
CSIRO Mineral Resources, Private Bag 10, Clayton South, Victoria 3169, Australia
Rupert Hochleitner
Affiliation:
Mineralogical State Collection (SNSB), Theresienstrasse 41, 80333, München, Germany
Christian Rewitzer
Affiliation:
Stadtplatz 17, 93437 Furth im Wald, Germany
Alan Riboldi-Tunnicliffe
Affiliation:
Australian Synchrotron, 800 Blackburn Road, Clayton, Victoria 3168, Australia
Anthony R. Kampf
Affiliation:
Mineral Sciences Department, Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County, 900 Exposition Boulevard, Los Angeles, CA90007, USA
Colin M. MacRae
Affiliation:
CSIRO Mineral Resources, Private Bag 10, Clayton South, Victoria 3169, Australia
W. Gus Mumme
Affiliation:
CSIRO Mineral Resources, Private Bag 10, Clayton South, Victoria 3169, Australia
Melanie Kaliwoda
Affiliation:
Mineralogical State Collection (SNSB), Theresienstrasse 41, 80333, München, Germany
Henrik Friis
Affiliation:
Natural History Museum, University of Oslo, PO Box 1172, Blindern, 0318 Oslo, Norway
Carlos U. Martin
Affiliation:
C/ Orquidea 23, 29190, Malaga, Spain.
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

The general structural formula for the walentaite group is [((A1yA1’1–y), A2)(H2O)n][Bx(As2)2–x(As3)M1(M2)2(TO4)2(O,OH)7], based on heteropolyhedral layers of configuration [M1(M2)2(TO4)2(O,OH)6], with surface-coordinated species at the B, As2 and As3 sites, and with interlayer hydrated cation groups centred at the A sites. The group is divided into walentaite and halilsarpite subgroups based on T = P5+ and As5+, respectively. Alcantarillaite, (IMA2019-072), [Fe3+0.50.5(H2O)4][CaAs3+2(Fe3+2.5W6+0.5)(AsO4)2O7], is a new member of the walentaite group from the Alcantarilla wolframite mine, Belalcázar, Córdoba, Andalusia, Spain. It occurs most commonly as lemon-yellow fillings together with massive scorodite in fissures and cracks in quartz adjacent to löllingite. It is also found as tiny yellow rosettes lining vugs and as spheroids of ultrathin blades. It is associated with scorodite, pharmacosiderite, ferberite and schneiderhöhnite. Optically it is biaxial (–), with α = 1.703(calc), β = 1.800(5), γ = 1.850(5) and 2V = 68(1)° (white light). Dispersion is r > v, moderate. The optical orientation is X = a, Y = c and Z = b. The calculated density is 3.06 g cm–3. Electron microprobe analyses together with crystal structure refinement results gives the empirical formula [Fe3+0.520.48(H2O)4][(Ca0.44K0.11Na0.05Fe2+0.240.42)As3+1.83][Fe3+2.54Al0.03W6+0.43)((As0.65P0.35)O4)2O5.86(OH)1.14]. Alcantarillaite is orthorhombic, with an average structure described in Imma, and with a = 24.038(8) Å, b = 7.444(3) Å, c = 10.387(3) Å, V = 1858.6(11) Å3 and Z = 4. The structure (wRobs = 0.078 for 651 reflections to a resolution of 0.91 Å) differs most significantly from other walentaite-group members in having an interlayer A2 site occupied. Square-pyramidal polyhedra centred at the A2 sites form edge-shared dimers, (Fe3+)2O4(H2O)4. The dimers share vertices with TO4 anions in the layers on either side to form 8-sided channels along [010] occupied by H2O molecules.

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Copyright © The Mineralogical Society of Great Britain and Ireland 2020

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Footnotes

Associate Editor: Oleg I Siidra

References

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Grey et al. supplementary material

Grey et al. supplementary material

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