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Evaluation of novel leaching assessment of nuclear waste glasses

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  27 December 2016

Clare L. Thorpe*
Affiliation:
Immobilisation Science Laboratory, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Sheffield, S1 3JD, U.K.
Russell J. Hand
Affiliation:
Immobilisation Science Laboratory, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Sheffield, S1 3JD, U.K.
Neil C. Hyatt
Affiliation:
Immobilisation Science Laboratory, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Sheffield, S1 3JD, U.K.
Albert A. Kruger
Affiliation:
U.S. Department of Energy, Office of River Protection, Richland, WA 99352
David S. Kosson
Affiliation:
Vanderbilt University, School of Engineering, 2301 Vanderbilt Place, Nashville, TN, US 37235
Michael J. Schweiger
Affiliation:
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99354
Brian J. Riley
Affiliation:
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99354
Claire L. Corkhill
Affiliation:
Immobilisation Science Laboratory, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Sheffield, S1 3JD, U.K.
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Abstract

This study investigates the use of ‘simple’ glasses, comprising six components, to represent the structure of complex LAW glasses proposed for Immobilized Low Activity Wastes from the Hanford site in the USA. The 18 elements present in ILAW glasses LAW A44, ORP LB2, and LAW A23 were represented by Al2O3, B2O3, CaO, Na2O, SiO2, and ZrO2 according to their coordination chemistry and their roles as network formers and modifiers. The dissolution behavior of each ‘simple’ glass was compared to its corresponding candidate “complex” LAW glass through PCT-B tests. Significant differences were observed; the durability of complex glasses was concluded to be LAW A44 > ORP LB2 ≥ LAW A23 whereas in their simplified versions the order was LAW A44 > LAW A23 > ORP LB2. These results are discussed in relation to compositional differences and highlight the importance of minor glass components in controlling glass durability. The implications of these results for the use of simplified glass compositions are discussed.

Type
Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2016 

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References

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