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Species richness, abundance, and phenology of fungal fruit bodies over 21 years in a Swiss forest plot

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  27 June 2001

Gerben STRAATSMA
Affiliation:
Applied Plant Research, Mushroom Research Unit, Postbus 6042, 5960 AA Horst, The Netherlands. E-mail: g.straatsma@ppo.dlo.nl.
François AYER
Affiliation:
Swiss Federal Research Institute WSL, Zuercherstrasse 111, CH-8903 Birmensdorf, Switzerland.
Simon EGLI
Affiliation:
Swiss Federal Research Institute WSL, Zuercherstrasse 111, CH-8903 Birmensdorf, Switzerland.
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Abstract

Fungal fruit bodies were surveyed on a plot area of 1500 m2 from 1975–99 (excluding 1980–83) in the fungal reserve La Chaneaz in western Switzerland. Fruit bodies were identified and counted on a weekly basis. Species richness and abundances varied strongly between years. More than 400 species were encountered. Many species were transient; particularly rich years showed species occurring for only one year. This indicates that the number of species will substantially increase if the survey is continued. Within years, the species richness, abundances and periods of fruiting were tightly correlated. The abundance data of species within a year seemed symmetrically distributed over their fruiting period. The relation between species richness and abundances within years was studied by fitting species-abundance plots, known from numerical ecology. The surface area under the curves was taken as a parameter for ecological/fungal diversity. Productivity was correlated with the precipitation from June until October. The time of fruit body appearance was correlated with the temperatures in July and August. As groups, mycorrhizal and saprotrophic species behaved similarly over the years. The productivity of species was compared with their distribution in The Netherlands indicating a correlation between the level of local abundance and the geographic range of species.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
© The British Mycological Society 2001

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