Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-768dbb666b-x9ds4 Total loading time: 0.272 Render date: 2023-02-06T15:43:02.608Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "useRatesEcommerce": false } hasContentIssue true

Media Freedom and the Institutional Underpinnings of Political Knowledge*

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  08 October 2013

Abstract

Recent empirical workin the study of political sophistication finds that citizens’ knowledge of politics is not only a function of their individual characteristics but also depends on the supply of information from their environment (the ‘information environment’). Yet this literature does not address the question of how the information environment may be shaped by institutional factors. This article aims to fill this void. It first argues that the relationship between a government and the media affects the information that is available to individual citizens. Using cross-national data, it then finds that less government interference with the media (1) positively affects political learning and (2) moderates the individual-level effect of education on learning.

Type
Original Articles
Copyright
Copyright © The European Political Science Association 2013 

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Footnotes

*Martijn Schoonvelde is Associate Research Fellow, Department of Politics, University of Exeter, Amory Building, Rennes Drive, Exeter, Devon, EX4 4RJ, United Kingdom (m.schoonvelde@exeter.ac.uk). He would like to thank Roland Kappe and anonymous reviewers for helpful comments and suggestions. Earlier versions of this article have been presented at the annual meetings of the Midwest Political Science Association and the European Political Science Association as well as the political science graduate student colloquium at Stony Brook University.

References

Achen, C.H. 1975. ‘Mass Political Attitudes and the Survey Response’. American Political Science Review 69(4):12181231.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Baek, M. 2009. ‘A Comparative Analysis of Political Communication Systems and Voter Turnout’. American Journal of Political Science 53(2):376393.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Barabas, J.Jerit, J.. 2009. ‘Estimating the Causal Effects of Media Coverage on Policy-Specific Knowledge’. American Journal of Political Science 53(1):7389.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Baum, M.A.Potter, P.B.K.. 2008. ‘The Relationships Between Mass Media, Public Opinion, and Foreign Policy: Toward a Theoretical Synthesis’. Annual Review of Political Science 11(1):3965.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Besley, T.Prat, A.. 2006. ‘Handcuffs For The Grabbing Hand? Media Capture and Government Accountability’. The American Economic Review 96(3):720736.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Campbell, A., Converse, P.E., Miller, W.E.Stokes, D.E.. 1960. The American Voter. University of Chicago Press.Google Scholar
Djankov, S., McLiesh, C., Nenova, T.Shleifer, A.. 2003. ‘Who Owns the Media?’ Journal of Law & Economics 46(2):341381.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Gelman, A.Hill, J. 2007. Data Analysis Using Regression and Multilevel/Hierarchical Models. Vol. 1. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Golder, M. 2005. ‘Democratic Electoral Systems Around the World, 1946-2000’. Electoral Studies 24(1):103121.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Gordon, S.B.Segura, G.M.. 1997. ‘Cross–National Variation in the Political Sophistication of Individuals: Capability or Choice?’ The Journal of Politics 59(1):126147.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hirschman, A.O. 1964. ‘The Paternity of an Index’. The American Economic Review 54(5):761762.Google Scholar
Hutchings, V.L. 2003. Public Opinion and Democratic Accountability: How Citizens Learn About Politics. Princeton University Press.Google Scholar
Jerit, J. 2009. ‘Understanding the Knowledge Gap: The Role of Experts and Journalists’. The Journal of Politics 71(2):442456.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Jerit, J., Barabas, J.Bolsen, T. 2006. ‘Citizens, Knowledge, and the Information Environment’. American Journal of Political Science 50(2):266282.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kahneman, D., Slovic, P.Tversky, A.. 1982. Judgment Under Uncertainty: Heuristics and Biases. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Leeson, P.T. 2008. ‘Media Freedom, Political Knowledge, and Participation’. The Journal of Economic Perspectives 22(2):155170.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Lupia, Arthur. 1994. ‘Shortcuts Versus Encyclopedias: Information and Voting Behavior in California Insurance Reform Elections’. American Political Science Review 88(1):6376.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Marshall, M.G., Jaggers, K.Gurr, T.R.. 2002. Polity IV Project: Political Regime Characteristics and Transitions, 1800-2002 [dataset]. College Park: Center for International Development and Conflict Management, University of Maryland.Google Scholar
Page, B.I.Shapiro, R.Y.. 1992. The Rational Public: Fifty Years of Trends in Americans’ Policy Preferences. University of Chicago Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Prat, A., Strömberg, D.. 2005. ‘Commercial Television and Voter Information’. CEPR Discussion Paper.Google Scholar
Prat, A., Strömberg, D.. 2011. ‘The Political Economy of Mass Media’. CEPR Discussion Paper.Google Scholar
Prior, M. 2005. ‘News vs. Entertainment: How Increasing Media Choice Widens Gaps in Political Knowledge and Turnout’. American Journal of Political Science 49(3):577592.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Rabe-Hesketh, S.Skrondal, A.. 2008. Multilevel and Longitudinal Modeling Using Stata. Stata Corp.Google Scholar
Sapiro, V.Shively, W.P.. 2003. Comparative Study of Elecotral Systems, 1996–2001: Module 1 Full Release [dataset]. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan, Center for Political Studies [producer and distributor].Google Scholar
Snyder, Jr., J.M., and D. Strömberg. 2010. ‘Press Coverage and Political Accountability’. Journal of Political Economy 118(2):355408.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
15
Cited by

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Media Freedom and the Institutional Underpinnings of Political Knowledge*
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Media Freedom and the Institutional Underpinnings of Political Knowledge*
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Media Freedom and the Institutional Underpinnings of Political Knowledge*
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *