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Public Attitudes toward an Epidemiological Study with Genomic Analysis in the Great East Japan Earthquake Disaster Area

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  28 March 2016

Mami Ishikuro*
Affiliation:
Tohoku Medical Megabank Organization (ToMMo), Tohoku University, Sendai, Japan
Naoki Nakaya
Affiliation:
Tohoku Medical Megabank Organization (ToMMo), Tohoku University, Sendai, Japan
Taku Obara
Affiliation:
Tohoku Medical Megabank Organization (ToMMo), Tohoku University, Sendai, Japan
Yuki Sato
Affiliation:
Tohoku Medical Megabank Organization (ToMMo), Tohoku University, Sendai, Japan
Hirohito Metoki
Affiliation:
Tohoku Medical Megabank Organization (ToMMo), Tohoku University, Sendai, Japan
Masahiro Kikuya
Affiliation:
Tohoku Medical Megabank Organization (ToMMo), Tohoku University, Sendai, Japan
Naho Tsuchiya
Affiliation:
Tohoku Medical Megabank Organization (ToMMo), Tohoku University, Sendai, Japan
Tomohiro Nakamura
Affiliation:
Tohoku Medical Megabank Organization (ToMMo), Tohoku University, Sendai, Japan
Fuji Nagami
Affiliation:
Tohoku Medical Megabank Organization (ToMMo), Tohoku University, Sendai, Japan
Shinichi Kuriyama
Affiliation:
Tohoku Medical Megabank Organization (ToMMo), Tohoku University, Sendai, Japan
Atsushi Hozawa
Affiliation:
Tohoku Medical Megabank Organization (ToMMo), Tohoku University, Sendai, Japan
*
Correspondence: Mami Ishikuro, PhD Tohoku Medical Megabank Organization (ToMMo) Tohoku University Sendai, Japan 2-1, Seiryo-machi Aoba-ku, Sendai, Miyagi, 980-8573, Japan E-mail: m_ishikuro@med.tohoku.ac.jp

Abstract

Introduction

The Great East Japan Earthquake of March 11, 2011 may have influenced the long-term health of those in the disaster area. It is important to collect current and future health information of the people living in the post-disaster area to provide appropriate health support and quality-oriented care. However, public perceptions of health and genomic studies in the Great East Japan Earthquake disaster area are still unknown.

Methods

A questionnaire survey was conducted in one town affected by the Great East Japan Earthquake and subsequent tsunami. The results of the questionnaire were tailed and the differences in responses to each question were assessed by sex and age.

Results

In 284 eligible people (137 men, 147 women), almost all participants agreed to join a health survey investigating the adverse effects of the disaster, and over 80% of the total participants agreed to genomic analysis. Over 70% of the participants wanted to receive pharmacogenetic testing and to receive feedback on which medications were suitable or unsuitable for them.

Conclusions

Most people living in the disaster area are interested in health surveys. Most of the participants also showed interest in genomic analysis.

IshikuroM, NakayaN, ObaraT, SatoY, MetokiH, KikuyaM, TsuchiyaN, NakamuraT, NagamiF, KuriyamaS, HozawaA, the ToMMo Study Group. Public Attitudes toward an Epidemiological Study with Genomic Analysis in the Great East Japan Earthquake Disaster Area. Prehosp Disaster Med. 2016;31(3):330–334.

Type
Brief Reports
Copyright
© World Association for Disaster and Emergency Medicine 2016 

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