Skip to main content
×
×
Home

Video-Based Learning vs Traditional Lecture for Instructing Emergency Medicine Residents in Disaster Medicine Principles of Mass Triage, Decontamination, and Personal Protective Equipment

  • Henry A. Curtis (a1), Karen Trang (a1), Kevin W. Chason (a2) and Paul D. Biddinger (a3)
Abstract
Introduction

Great demands have been placed on disaster medicine educators. There is a need to develop innovative methods to educate Emergency Physicians in the ever-expanding body of disaster medicine knowledge. The authors sought to demonstrate that video-based learning (VBL) could be a promising alternative to traditional learning methods for teaching disaster medicine core competencies.

Hypothesis/Problem

The objective was to compare VBL to traditional lecture (TL) for instructing Emergency Medicine residents in the American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP; Irving, Texas USA) disaster medicine core competencies of patient triage and decontamination.

Methods

A randomized, controlled pilot study compared two methods of instruction for mass triage, decontamination, and personal protective equipment (PPE). Emergency Medicine resident learning was measured with a knowledge quiz, a Likert scale measuring comfort, and a practical exercise. An independent samples t-test compared the scoring of the VBL with the TL group.

Results

Twenty-six residents were randomized to VBL (n=13) or TL (n=13). Knowledge score improvement following video (14.9%) versus lecture (14.1%) did not differ significantly between the groups (P=.74). Comfort score improvement also did not differ (P=.64) between video (18.3%) and lecture groups (15.8%). In the practical skills assessment, the VBL group outperformed the TL group overall (70.4% vs 55.5%; P<.0001), with significantly better performance in donning PPE and decontamination. Although not part of the original study design, a three-month post-hoc analysis was performed. When comparing the pre-intervention and three-month post-hoc performances, there were no significant differences in knowledge increases between VBL versus TL (P=.41) or in comfort (P=.39).

Conclusion

Video modules can be as effective as TL when utilized to train Emergency Medicine residents in the ACEP disaster medicine core competencies of patient triage and decontamination.

Curtis HA , Trang K , Chason KW , Biddinger PD . Video-Based Learning vs Traditional Lecture for Instructing Emergency Medicine Residents in Disaster Medicine Principles of Mass Triage, Decontamination, and Personal Protective Equipment. Prehosp Disaster Med. 2018;33(1):712.

Copyright
Corresponding author
Correspondence: Henry A Curtis, MD, FACEP, FAAEM 652 Shotwell Street San Francisco, California 94110 USA E-mail: henryacurtis@gmail.com
Footnotes
Hide All

Conflicts of interest: none

Footnotes
References
Hide All
1. Schultz, CH, Koenig, KL, Whiteside, M, Murray, R, National Standardized All-Hazard Disaster Core Competencies Task Force. Development of national standardized all-hazard disaster core competencies for acute care physicians, nurses, and EMS professionals. Ann Emerg Med. 2012;59(3):196-208.
2. Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations. Healthcare at the Crossroads: Strategies for Creating and Sustaining Community-Wide Emergency Preparedness Systems. JCAHO; Washington, DC USA; 2003.
3. US Department of Labor, Occupational Safety, and Health Administration. OSHA Best Practices for Hospital-based First Receivers of Victims from Mass Casualty Incidents Involving the Release of Hazardous Substances. OSHA: Washington, DC USA; 2005.
4. Sarin, RR, Cattamanchi, S, Alqahtani, A, Aljohani, M, Ardalan, A, Ciottone, G. Disaster Education: A Survey Study to Analyze Disaster Medicine Training in Emergency Medicine Residency Programs in the United States. American College of Emergency Physicians Research Forum; Chicago, Illinois USA. Prehosp Disaster Med. 2017;32(4):368-373.
5. Paganini, M, Borrelli, F, Cattani, J, et al. Assessment of disaster preparedness among emergency departments in Italian hospitals: a cautious warning for disaster risk reduction and management capacity. Scand J Trauma Resusc Emerg Med. 2016;24(1):101.
6. ACGME Emergency Medicine Programs Academic Year 2016-2017 United States. Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education website. https://apps.acgme.org/ads/Public/Reports/Report/1. Accessed March 20, 2017.
7. Cardall, S, Krupat, E, Ulrich, M. Live lecture versus video-recorded lecture: are students voting with their feet? Acad Med. 2008;83(12):1174-1178.
8. US Department of Homeland Security. Weapons of Mass Destruction: Technical Emergency Response Training Student Manual PER-260. US DHS; Washington, DC USA; 2005.
9. US Medical Institute of Chemical Defense. Hospital Management of Chemical, Biological, Radiological/Nuclear, and Explosive Incidents course syllabus. US MICD; Washington, DC USA; 2009.
10. US Army Training and Doctrine Command. CBRN Decontamination: Multiservice Tactics, Techniques, and Procedures for Chemical, Biological, Radiological, and Nuclear Decontamination: FM 3-11.5. US Army; Fort Monroe, Virginia USA; 2006.
11. US Army Soldier and Biological Chemical Command (SBCCOM). Chemical Weapons Improved Response Program (CWIRP) Playbook: Guidelines for Responding to and Managing a Chemical Weapons of Mass Destruction Terrorist Event. US Army; Washington, DC USA; 2000.
12. US Army Soldier and Biological Chemical Command (SBCCOM). Guidelines for Use of Personal Protective Equipment by Law Enforcement Personnel During a Terrorist Chemical Agent Incident. US Army; Washington, DC USA; 2001.
13. US Army Medical Research Institute of Chemical Defense (USAMRICD), Chemical Casualty Care Division. Medical Management of Chemical Casualties Handbook. USAMRICD; Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland USA; 2007.
14. US Army Training and Doctrine Command. Multiservice Tactics, Techniques, and Procedures for Treatment of Chemical Agent Casualties and Conventional Military Chemical Injuries: FM 4-02.285 (FM 8-285). US Army; Fort Monroe, Virginia USA; 2007.
15. US Army Soldier and Biological Chemical Command (SBCCOM). Guidelines for Mass Casualty Decontamination During a Terrorist Chemical Agent Incident. US Army; Washington, DC USA; 2000.
16. Homepage. Website for Hazmat for Healthcare Hazmat for Healthcare website. http://www.hazmatforhealthcare.org/index.cfm?section=1. Accessed March 20, 2017.
17. Duodote™ (Atropine and Pralidoxime Chloride Injection) Auto-Injector instruction sheet . 1st ed. Meridian Medical Technologies. Inc; Columbia, Maryland USA; 2012: 1-8.
18. United Kingdom Home Office. The Decontamination of People Exposed to Chemical, Biological, Radiological or Nuclear (CBRN) Substances or Material. Strategic National Guidance. 2nd ed. London, United Kingdom; 2004.
19. START Adult Triage Algorithm Chemical Hazards Emergency Medical Management. US Department of Health and Human Services website. https://chemm.nlm.nih.gov/startadult.htm. Accessed March 20, 2017.
20. Gray, D. Disaster plan education: how we made and tested a video. J Accid Emerg Med. 1996;13(1):21-22.
21. Einspruch, EL, Lynch, B, Aufderheide, TP, Nichol, G, Becker, L. Retention of CPR skills learned in a traditional AHA Heartsaver course versus 30-min video self-training: a controlled randomized study. Resuscitation. 2007;74(3):476-486.
22. Lynch, B, Einspruch, EL, Nichol, G, Becker, LB, Aufderheide, TP, Idris, A. Effectiveness of a 30-min CPR self-instruction program for lay responders: a controlled randomized study. Resuscitation. 2005;67(1):31-43.
23. Curtis, H. The Role of Video Based Learning in the Development of Comprehensive Disaster Medicine Education. American College of Emergency Physicians Disaster Medicine Section Newsletter in American College of Emergency Physicians website. https://www.acep.org/content.aspx?id=49172. Accessed March 20, 2017.
24. Bartley, B, Fisher, J, Stella, J. Video of a disaster drill is effective in educating registrars on the hospital disaster plan. Emerg Med Australas. 2007;19(1):39-44.
25. Radiological terrorism: just in time training for hospital clinicians. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website. https://emergency.cdc.gov/radiation/justintime.asp. Accessed March 20, 2017.
26. McCurley, MC, Miller, CW, Tucker, FE, et al. Educating medical staff about responding to a radiological or nuclear emergency. Health Phys. 2009;96(5 Suppl 2):S50-54.
27. T-L W. Impact of on-line video teaching on utilization of web-based and non-web-based learning in disaster medicine in Taiwan. Ann Disaster Med. 2006;4(2):66-71.
28. Hsu, EB, Jenckes, MW, Catlett, CL, et al. Effectiveness of hospital staff mass-casualty incident training methods: a systematic literature review. Prehosp Disaster Med. 2004;19(3):191-199.
Recommend this journal

Email your librarian or administrator to recommend adding this journal to your organisation's collection.

Prehospital and Disaster Medicine
  • ISSN: 1049-023X
  • EISSN: 1945-1938
  • URL: /core/journals/prehospital-and-disaster-medicine
Please enter your name
Please enter a valid email address
Who would you like to send this to? *
×

Keywords

" class="button small radius grey keywords">
American College of Emergency Physicians
  • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
  • " class="button small radius grey keywords">
    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
  • cardiopulmonary resuscitation
  • " class="button small radius grey keywords">
    cardiopulmonary resuscitation
  • post-graduate year
  • " class="button small radius grey keywords">
    post-graduate year
  • personal protective equipment
  • " class="button small radius grey keywords">
    personal protective equipment
  • traditional lecture
  • " class="button small radius grey keywords">
    traditional lecture
  • video-based learning
  • " class="button small radius grey keywords">
    video-based learning
    Type Description Title
    WORD
    Supplementary materials

    Curtis et al. supplementary material
    Curtis et al. supplementary material 3

     Word (66 KB)
    66 KB
    WORD
    Supplementary materials

    Curtis et al. supplementary material
    Curtis et al. supplementary material 1

     Word (61 KB)
    61 KB
    WORD
    Supplementary materials

    Curtis et al. supplementary material
    Curtis et al. supplementary material 2

     Word (38 KB)
    38 KB

    Metrics

    Altmetric attention score

    Full text views

    Total number of HTML views: 10
    Total number of PDF views: 82 *
    Loading metrics...

    Abstract views

    Total abstract views: 727 *
    Loading metrics...

    * Views captured on Cambridge Core between 10th January 2018 - 19th August 2018. This data will be updated every 24 hours.