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Good practice issues in psychiatric intensive-care units: Findings from a national survey

  • Stephen Pereira (a1), M. Dominic Beer (a1) and Carol Paton (a1)
Abstract
Aims and method

To survey some aspects of care relevant to good practice in psychiatric intensive-care units.

Results

A number of areas of concern were identified, including care issues for informal and female patients, a lack of uniform clinical leadership and a paucity of policies/guidelines for high-risk areas of clinical practice.

Clinical implications

In an attempt to provide a service for the most disturbed patients from widely varying sources, psychiatric intensive-care units are at risk of compromising the ability to provide good-quality clinical care.

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Copyright
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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References
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BJPsych Bulletin
  • ISSN: 0955-6036
  • EISSN: 1472-1473
  • URL: /core/journals/bjpsych-bulletin
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Good practice issues in psychiatric intensive-care units: Findings from a national survey

  • Stephen Pereira (a1), M. Dominic Beer (a1) and Carol Paton (a1)
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