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Brain Imaging and Treatment Response in Spasmodic Torticollis

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 January 2018

J. A. O. Besson*
Affiliation:
Department of Mental Health
K. P. Ebmeier
Affiliation:
Department of Mental Health
H. G. Gemmell
Affiliation:
Department of Biomedical Physics, University of Aberdeen
P. F. Sharp
Affiliation:
Department of Biomedical Physics, University of Aberdeen
M. McFadyen
Affiliation:
Royal Cornhill Hospital, Aberdeen
F. W. Smith
Affiliation:
Dept of Nuclear Medicine, Aberdeen Royal Infirmary
*
University of Aberdeen, Department of Mental Health, University Medical Buildings, Foresterhill, Aberdeen AB9 2ZD

Abstract

A patient with spasms of the neck, occurring when he turned his head to the left, responded to treatment with benzhexol. Cerebral blood flow imaging demonstrated reduced uptake in the right corpus striatum compared with the left. The study demonstrates the presence of an abnormality in the basal ganglia; it also illustrates response to drug treatment. Cerebral blood flow imaging may be useful in the detection of basal ganglia abnormalities in spasmodic torticollis and assist in the selection of cases which should be targeted for treatment with drugs.

Type
Brief Reports
Copyright
Copyright © Royal College of Psychiatrists, 1988 

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References

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