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The Maine and Vermont Three-Decade Studies of Serious Mental Illness

I. Matched Comparison of Cross-Sectional Outcome

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 January 2018

Michael J. DeSisto*
Affiliation:
Bureau of Mental Health, State of Maine, Augusta, Maine
Courtenay M. Harding
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, Yale University, New Haven, CT
Rodney V. McCormick
Affiliation:
Department of Medical Biostatistics
Takamaru Ashikaga
Affiliation:
Department of Medical Biostatistics
George W. Brooks
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, College of Medicine, University of Vermont, Burlington, VT, USA
*
Dr Michael DeSisto, Outcomes, Inc., 18 Sheldon Street, Farmingdale, ME 04334, USA

Abstract

Background

This study compared long-term outcome of serious mental illness in two states using a matched design to assess psychiatric rehabilitation programmes; Vermont subjects participated in a model psychiatric rehabilitation programme, while the Maine group received more traditional care.

Method

Maine and Vermont subjects (n = 269) were matched by age, sex, diagnosis, and chronicity. Demographic, illness, and life history information were abstracted from hospital records by clinicians blind to outcome. DSM–III criteria were applied retrospectively. Outcome was assessed by clinicians blind to history.

Results

Vermont subjects alive at follow-up (n = 180) were more productive (P < 0.0009), had fewer symptoms (P < 0.002), better community adjustment (P < 0.001) and global functioning (P < 0.0001) than Maine subjects (n = 119).

Conclusions

Outcome differences may be due to Vermont's model programme and a policy of allowing an earlier opportunity for community life.

Type
Papers
Copyright
Copyright © 1995 The Royal College of Psychiatrists

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