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Perceived Parental Rearing Styles of Agoraphobic and Socially Phobic In-patients

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 January 2018

W. A. Arrindell*
Affiliation:
Faculty of Medicine of the Vrije Universiteit, Department of Psychiatry, Amsterdam Psychiatric Centre (The Valerius Clinic), Valeriusplein 9, 1075 BG Amsterdam, The Netherlands
M. G. T. Kwee
Affiliation:
Joris Psychiatric Centre (Sint Joris Gasthuis), Department of Behavioural Psychotherapy, Sint Jorisweg 2, 2612 GA Delft
G. J. Methorst
Affiliation:
Department of Clinical, Health and Personality Psychology of the University of Leiden, Hooigracht 15, 2312 KM Leiden
J. van der Ende
Affiliation:
Department of Family Medicine, University of Groningen, Antonius Deusinglaan 4, 9713 AW Groningen
E. Pol
Affiliation:
Department of Clinical, Health and Personality Psychology of the University of Leiden, Hooigracht 15, 2312 KM Leiden
B. J. M. Moritz
Affiliation:
Department of Clinical, Health and Personality Psychology of the University of Leiden, Hooigracht 15, 2312 KM Leiden
*
Correspondence

Abstract

The perceived parental rearing practices and attitudes of agoraphobics, social phobics and non-patient normal controls were investigated, employing the EMBU, an inventory for assessing memories of upbringing. Findings obtained previously with out-patients were replicated with in-patients as subjects. Compared with the controls, agoraphobics rated both their parents as having been less emotionally warm but only their mothers as having been rejective. Socially phobic in-patients rated both their parents as having been rejective, as having lacked emotional warmth, and as having been over-protective. Comparisons between agoraphobics and social phobics showed differences in certain aspects of parental rearing, with the socially phobic in-patients assigning ratings more negatively than the agoraphobic group.

Type
Papers
Copyright
Copyright © Royal College of Psychiatrists 1989 

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