Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-544b6db54f-jcwnq Total loading time: 0.169 Render date: 2021-10-16T04:56:19.283Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

Specific and Non-specific Effects of Educational Intervention with Families Living with a Schizophrenic Relative

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 January 2018

J. V. Smith*
Affiliation:
Department of Clinical Psychology, All Saints Hospital, Birmingham and Department of Psychology, University of Birmingham
M. J. Birchwood
Affiliation:
Department of Clinical Psychology, All Saints Hospital, Birmingham and Department of Psychology, University of Birmingham
*
All Saints Hospital, Winson Green, Birmingham B18 5SD

Abstract

A brief educational intervention with families living with a schizophrenic relative is described and evaluated in terms of benefits for relatives' well-being and patient recovery. Education led to considerable knowledge gains and to reductions in relatives' reported stress symptoms and fear of the patient. There was a trend for relatives to be more optimistic concerning their role in treatment. At 6 months follow-up, only knowledge gains were maintained; however, relatives' perceptions of family burden were significantly reduced. The evidence suggests that family education may be useful both as a cost-effective intervention in its own right and in facilitating a more receptive attitude to subsequent family intervention.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © 1987 The Royal College of Psychiatrists 

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Berkowitz, R., Eberlein-Fries, R., Kuipers, L. & Leff, J. (1984) Educating relatives about schizophrenia. Schizophrenia Bulletin, 10, 418429.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Birchwood, M. (1983) Family Coping Behaviour and the Course of Schizophrenia. Unpublished PhD thesis, University of Birmingham.Google ScholarPubMed
Birchwood, M. & Smith, J. (1987) Schizophrenia. In Coping with Disorder in the Family (ed. J. Orford). Beckenham, Kent: Croom-Helm.Google Scholar
Carstairs, G., Early, D., Rollin, H. & Wing, J. (1985) Informing relatives about schizophrenia. Bulletin of the Royal College of Psychiatrists, 9, 5960.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Cochrane, R. (1980) A comparison of the symptom rating test and the Langner 22 item scale for use in epidemiological surveys. Psychological Medicine, 10, 115125.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Falloon, I., Boyd, J., McGill, C., Razani, J., Moss, H. & Gildeman, A. (1982) Family managment in the prevention and exacerbation of schizophrenia: A controlled study. New England Journal of Medicine, 306, 14371440.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Flesch, R. (1948) A new readability yardstick. Journal of Applied Psychology, 32, 221233.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Gibbons, J., Horn, S., Powell, J. & Gibbons, J. (1984) Schizophrenic patients and their families. A survey in a psychiatric service based on a DGH Unit. British Journal of Psychiatry, 144, 7077.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Goldman, H. (1980) The post-hospital mental patient and family therapy: prospects and populations Journal of Marital and Family Therapy, 6, 447452.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Goldstein, M. & Kopeikin, H. (1981) Short and long term effects of combining drug and family therapy. In New Developments in Interventions with Families of Schizophrenics (ed. M. Goldstein). San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.Google Scholar
Greenley, J. (1979) Family symptom tolerance and rehospitalisation experiences of psychiatric patients. Research in Community and Mental Health, 1, 357386.Google Scholar
Holden, D. & Lewine, R. (1974) How families evaluate mental health professionals, resources and effects of illness Schizophrenia Bulletin, 10, 626633.Google Scholar
Kellner, R. & Sheffield, B. (1973) A self rating scale of distress. Psychological Medicine, 3, 88100.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Kuipers, L. (1979) Expressed emotion: a review. British Journal of Social and Clinical Psychology, 18, 237243.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Leff, J., Kuipers, L., Berkowitz, R., Eberlein-Fries, R. & Sturgeon, D. (1982) A controlled trial of social intervention in the families of schizophrenic patients. British Journal of Psychiatry, 141, 121134.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
McGill, C., Falloon, I., Boyd, J. & Wood-Siverio, C. (1983) Family educational intervention in the treatment of schizophrenia. Hospital and Community Psychiatry, 34, 934938.Google ScholarPubMed
Pasamanick, B., Scarpitti, F. & Dinitz, S. (1967) Schizophrenics in the Community, New York: Appleton-Century-Crofts.Google Scholar
Schneider, K. (1959) Clinical Psychopathology, New York: Grune & Stratton.Google Scholar
Submit a response

eLetters

No eLetters have been published for this article.
118
Cited by

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Specific and Non-specific Effects of Educational Intervention with Families Living with a Schizophrenic Relative
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Specific and Non-specific Effects of Educational Intervention with Families Living with a Schizophrenic Relative
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Specific and Non-specific Effects of Educational Intervention with Families Living with a Schizophrenic Relative
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *