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Attention to the eyes and fear-recognition deficits in child psychopathy

  • Mark R. Dadds (a1), Yael Perry (a1), David J. Hawes (a1), Sabine Merz (a1), Alison C. Riddell (a1), Damien J. Haines (a1), Emel Solak (a1) and Amali I. Abeygunawardane (a1)...
Summary

The ability to recognise fear is impaired in people with damage to the amygdala and, interestingly, in adult psychopathy. Here we confirm that deficits in recognising fear exist in children with psychopathic traits. We show for the first time that, as with patients with amygdala damage, this deficit can be temporarily corrected by simply asking them to focus on the eyes of other people. These data support models of psychopathy that emphasise specific dysfunction of the amygdala and suggest an innovative approach for intervening early in the development of psychopathy.

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Copyright
Corresponding author
Dr Mark R. Dadds, School of Psychology, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052, Australia. Email: m.dadds@unsw.edu.au
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Declaration of interest

None. Funding detailed in Acknowledgements.

Footnotes
References
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The British Journal of Psychiatry
  • ISSN: 0007-1250
  • EISSN: 1472-1465
  • URL: /core/journals/the-british-journal-of-psychiatry
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Attention to the eyes and fear-recognition deficits in child psychopathy

  • Mark R. Dadds (a1), Yael Perry (a1), David J. Hawes (a1), Sabine Merz (a1), Alison C. Riddell (a1), Damien J. Haines (a1), Emel Solak (a1) and Amali I. Abeygunawardane (a1)...
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