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Fetal antipsychotic exposure in a changing landscape: seeing the future

  • Kathryn M. Abel (a1)
Summary

Pregnant women and their fetuses are increasingly likely to be exposed to antipsychotics. However, safety data remain limited. This editorial suggests that, in future, well-designed observational pharmaco-epidemiology is our best chance of illuminating risk for exposed populations and of informing decision-making for women and clinicians.

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References
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The British Journal of Psychiatry
  • ISSN: 0007-1250
  • EISSN: 1472-1465
  • URL: /core/journals/the-british-journal-of-psychiatry
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Fetal antipsychotic exposure in a changing landscape: seeing the future

  • Kathryn M. Abel (a1)
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