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Prevalence of reactive attachment disorder in a deprived population

  • Helen Minnis (a1), Susan Macmillan (a2), Rachel Pritchett (a3), David Young (a4), Brenda Wallace (a4), John Butcher (a4), Fiona Sim (a4), Katie Baynham (a4), Claire Davidson (a4) and Christopher Gillberg (a4)...
Abstract
Background

Reactive attachment disorder (RAD) is associated with early childhood maltreatment and has unknown population prevalence beyond infancy.

Aims

To estimate RAD prevalence in a deprived population of children.

Method

All 1646 children aged 6-8 years old in a deprived sector of an urban UK centre were screened for RAD symptoms. Parents of high and low scorers were interviewed using semi-structured interviews probing for psychopathology and individuals likely to have RAD were offered face-to-face assessment.

Results

Questionnaire data were available from 92.8% of teachers and 65.8% of parents. Assessments were conducted with 50% of those invited and missing data were imputed - based on the baseline data - for the rest. We calculated that there would be 23 children with definite RAD diagnoses, suggesting that the prevalence of RAD in this population was 1.40% (95% CI 0.94-2.10).

Conclusions

In this deprived general population, RAD was not rare.

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Copyright
Corresponding author
Helen Minnis, Institute of Mental Health & Wellbeing, University of Glasgow, Caledonia House, Royal Hospital for Sick Children, Yorkhill, Glasgow G3 8SJ, UK. Email: Helen.Minnis@glasgow.ac.uk
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Declaration of interest

None.

Footnotes
References
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The British Journal of Psychiatry
  • ISSN: 0007-1250
  • EISSN: 1472-1465
  • URL: /core/journals/the-british-journal-of-psychiatry
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Prevalence of reactive attachment disorder in a deprived population

  • Helen Minnis (a1), Susan Macmillan (a2), Rachel Pritchett (a3), David Young (a4), Brenda Wallace (a4), John Butcher (a4), Fiona Sim (a4), Katie Baynham (a4), Claire Davidson (a4) and Christopher Gillberg (a4)...
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