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The epistemic challenges of CTOs: Commentary on … Community treatment orders

  • Edwina Light (a1)
Summary

Controversy around the use of community treatment orders (CTOs) arises in part from their ambiguous evidence base. Recent research has provided valuable new insights into the effects of CTOs, while also highlighting the critical importance of first understanding what CTOs are and what they are meant to achieve. A genuine public discourse on the significance of CTOs will have multiple perspectives. This necessitates a more pluralistic approach to constructing the necessary knowledge of CTOs to enable communities to make sound decisions about their use.

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Copyright
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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Footnotes
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See editorial, pp. 3–5, this issue.

Declaration of interest

None.

Footnotes
References
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22 Centre for Values, Ethics and Law in Medicine. Community Treatment Orders: The Lived Experience of Consumers and Carers in NSW. Centre for Values, Ethics and Law in Medicine, in press.
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BJPsych Bulletin
  • ISSN: 2053-4868
  • EISSN: 2053-4876
  • URL: /core/journals/bjpsych-bulletin
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The epistemic challenges of CTOs: Commentary on … Community treatment orders

  • Edwina Light (a1)
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