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Standardised patients with intellectual disabilities in training tomorrow's doctors

  • Bini Thomas (a1), Ken Courtenay (a2) (a3), Angela Hassiotis (a3) (a4), Andre Strydom (a3) (a4) and Khadija Rantell (a5)...
Abstract
Aims and method

To develop a programme to help undergraduate medical students and postgraduate trainees to improve their skills in communicating with people with intellectual disabilities through teaching sessions that had input from simulated patients with intellectual disabilities. We conducted four sessions of training for 47 undergraduate 4th-year medical students. The training involved a multiprofessional taught session followed by a clinical scenario role-play with simulated patients who were people with intellectual disabilities. The training was assessed by completing the healthcare provider questionnaire before and after the training.

Results

There were improvements in the students' perceived skill, comfort and the type of clinical approach across all three scenarios.

Clinical implications

By involving people with intellectual disabilities in training medical students there has been a significant improvement in students' communication skills in areas of perceived skills, comfort and type of clinical approach which will raise the quality of care provided by them in the future.

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Copyright
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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Declaration of interest

None.

Footnotes
References
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BJPsych Bulletin
  • ISSN: 2053-4868
  • EISSN: 2053-4876
  • URL: /core/journals/bjpsych-bulletin
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Standardised patients with intellectual disabilities in training tomorrow's doctors

  • Bini Thomas (a1), Ken Courtenay (a2) (a3), Angela Hassiotis (a3) (a4), Andre Strydom (a3) (a4) and Khadija Rantell (a5)...
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