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How change comes: translating biological research into care

  • Fiona Gaughran (a1) and Shitij Kapur (a1)
Summary

Thousands of papers have been published on the biological associations with psychosis yet this has had a limited impact on the routine clinical care of people with psychosis. Cognitive dysfunction, genetics and neuroimaging are the research areas likely to integrate into clinical practice in psychosis most rapidly. Clinical and academic collaborations in partnership with patients and carers are necessary to make progress, along with an acceptance that not all new approaches will necessarily prove effective in the longer term. Most discoveries do not just jump from bench to bedside, but require active interactions between scientists and clinicians.

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Copyright
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Corresponding author
Fiona Gaughran (fiona.1.gaughran@kcl.ac.uk)
Footnotes
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Declaration of interest

F.G. has received grant support from the UK Department of Health, consultant/advisor/speaking fees from Bristol-Myers Squibb, Partnership in Care and Roche, and has family connections with Lilly and GlaxoSmithKline. S.K. has received grant support from AstraZeneca, Bristol-Myers Squibb and GlaxoSmithKline, and consultant/scientific advisor/speaking fees from AstraZeneca, Bioline, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Eli Lilly, Janssen (Johnson and Johnson), Lundbeck, NeuroSearch, Otsuka, Pfizer, Roche, Servier and Solvay Wyeth.

Footnotes
References
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BJPsych Bulletin
  • ISSN: 1758-3209
  • EISSN: 1758-3217
  • URL: /core/journals/bjpsych-bulletin
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How change comes: translating biological research into care

  • Fiona Gaughran (a1) and Shitij Kapur (a1)
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