Skip to main content
×
×
Home

Jinn and mental health: looking at jinn possession in modern psychiatric practice

  • Simon Dein (a1) and Abdool Samad Illaiee (a2)
Summary

This article focuses on jinn possession and mental illness in Islam. After discussing spirit possession generally and its classification in DSM-5, we present an overview of several studies examining the role of jinn in mental distress in Muslims in the UK. A case study which exemplifies jinn possession is presented and the clinical implications of the findings are discussed. We argue for collaborative working relationships between Islamic religious professionals and mental health professionals. Finally, we discuss potential areas for future research.

  • View HTML
    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Jinn and mental health: looking at jinn possession in modern psychiatric practice
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Jinn and mental health: looking at jinn possession in modern psychiatric practice
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Jinn and mental health: looking at jinn possession in modern psychiatric practice
      Available formats
      ×
Copyright
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Corresponding author
Simon Dein (s.dein@ucl.ac.uk)
Footnotes
Hide All

Declaration of interest

S.D. is on the Executive Committee of the Royal College of Psychiatrists' Spirituality and Psychiatry Special Interest Group.

Footnotes
References
Hide All
1 Cohen, E. What is spirit possession? Defining, comparing, and explaining two possession forms. Ethnos 2008; 73: 101–26.
2 Khalifa, N, Hardie, T. Possession and jinn. J R Soc Med 2005; 98: 351–3.
3 Littlewood, R. Possession states. Psychiatry 2004; 3 (8): 810.
4 Lewis, IM. Ecstatic Religion: A Study of Shamanism and Spirit Possession (2nd edn). Routledge, 1989.
5 Høyersten, JG. Possessed! Some historical, psychiatric and current moments of demonic possession [in Norwegian]. Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen 1996; 116: 3602–6.
6 Halliburton, M. ‘Just some spirits’: the erosion of spirit possession and the rise of ‘tension’ in South India. Med Anthropology 2005; 24: 111–44.
7 Gaw, AC, Ding, Q-Z, Levine, RE, Gaw, H-F. The clinical characteristics of possession disorder among 20 Chinese patients in the Hebei Province of China. Psychiatr Serv 1998; 49: 360–5.
8 Greenberg, D, Witztum, E. Sanity and Sanctity: Mental Health Work among the Ultra-Orthodox in Jerusalem. Yale University Press, 2001.
9 Pfeifer, S. Demonic attributions in nondelusional disorders. Psychopathology 1999; 32: 252–9.
10 American Psychiatric Association. Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, Text Revision (DSM-IV-TR). American Psychiatric Press, 2000.
11 Cardeña, E, van Duijl, M, Weiner, LA, Terhune, DB. Possession/trance phenomena. In Dissociation and the Dissociative Disorders: DSM-V and Beyond (eds Dell, PF, O'Neil, JA): 171–84. Routledge, 2009.
12 American Psychiatric Association. Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (Fifth Edition) (DSM-5). APA, 2013.
13 Ruqya and Healing – according to the Quran and Sunnah (http:www.ruqyahandhealing.co.uk).
14 Al-Ashqar, US. The World of the Jinn & Devils in the Light of the Qur'an and Sunnah (Islamic Creed Series, Volume 3). International Islamic Publishing House, 2003.
15 Al-Jibaly, M. Sickness, Regulations and Exhortations (The Inevitable Journey Series). Al Kitaab & As-Sunnah Publishing, 1998.
16 Boddy, J. Wombs and Alien Spirits: Women, Men and the Zar Cult in Northern Sudan. University of Wisconsin Press, 1989.
17 Kapferer, B. A Celebration of Demons: Exorcism and the Aesthetics of Healing in Sri Lanka. Berg Publishers, 1991.
18 Lambek, M. Knowledge and Practice in Mayotte: Local Discourses of Islam, Sorcery, and Spirit Possession. University of Toronto Press, 1993.
19 Messing, SD. Group therapy and social status in the Zar cult of Ethiopia. Am Anthropol 1958; 60: 1120–6.
20 Younis, YO. Possession and exorcism: an illustrative case. Arab J Psychiatry 2000; 11: 56–9.
21 Dein, S, Alexander, M, Napier, AD. Jinn, psychiatry and contested notions of misfortune among east London Bangladeshis. Transcult Psychiatry 2008; 35: 3155.
22 Aslam, M. The practice of Asian medicine in the United Kingdom [PhD thesis]. University of Nottingham, UK, 1970.
23 Dein, S, Sembhi, S. The use of traditional healers in South Asian psychiatric patients in the UK: interactions between professional and folk remedies. Transcult Psychiatry 2001; 38: 243–57.
24 Healy, MA, Aslam, M. The Asian Community: Medicines and Traditions. Amadeus Press, 1989.
25 Weiss, M, Desai, A, Jadhav, S, Gupta, L, Channabasavanna, S, Doongaji, D, et al. Humoral concepts of mental illness in India. Soc Sci Med 1988; 27: 471–7.
26 El-Islam, F. Cultural aspects of illness behaviour. Arab J Psychiatry 1995; 6: 13–8.
27 Khalifa, N, Hardie, T, Mullick, MSI. Jinn and Psychiatry: Comparison of Beliefs among Muslims in Dhaka and Leicester. Publications Archive: Royal College of Psychiatrists' Spirituality and Psychiatry Special Interest Group, 2012 (http://www.rcpsych.ac.uk/workinpsychiatry/specialinterestgroups/spirituality/publicationsarchive.aspxk).
28 Dein, S. Magic and jinn among Bangladeshis in the United Kingdom suffering from physical and mental health problems: controlling the uncontrollable. In Research in the Social Scientific Study of Religion (Volume 24) (eds Piedmont, RL, Village, A): 193220. Brill.
29 Khalifa, N, Hardie, T, Latif, S, Jamil, I, Walker, DM. Beliefs about jinn, black magic and evil eye among Muslims: age, gender and first language influences. Int J Cult Ment Health 2011; 4: 6877.
Recommend this journal

Email your librarian or administrator to recommend adding this journal to your organisation's collection.

BJPsych Bulletin
  • ISSN: 1758-3209
  • EISSN: 1758-3217
  • URL: /core/journals/bjpsych-bulletin
Please enter your name
Please enter a valid email address
Who would you like to send this to? *
×

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 42
Total number of PDF views: 315 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 859 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between 2nd January 2018 - 22nd July 2018. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Jinn and mental health: looking at jinn possession in modern psychiatric practice

  • Simon Dein (a1) and Abdool Samad Illaiee (a2)
Submit a response

eLetters

No eLetters have been published for this article.

×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *