Skip to main content
×
Home
    • Aa
    • Aa
  • Access
  • Cited by 13
  • Cited by
    This article has been cited by the following publications. This list is generated based on data provided by CrossRef.

    Grigorenko, Elena L. Bick, Johanna Campbell, Daniel J. Lewine, Gabrielle Abrams, Jennifer Nguyen, Victoria and Chang, Joseph T. 2016. Developmental Psychopathology.


    Ming, Qingsen Zhang, Yun Yi, Jinyao Wang, Xiang Zhu, Xiongzhao and Yao, Shuqiao 2015. Serotonin transporter gene polymorphism (5-HTTLPR) L allele interacts with stress to increase anxiety symptoms in Chinese adolescents: a multiwave longitudinal study. BMC Psychiatry, Vol. 15, Issue. 1,


    Plieger, Thomas Montag, Christian Felten, Andrea and Reuter, Martin 2014. The serotonin transporter polymorphism (5-HTTLPR) and personality: response style as a new endophenotype for anxiety. The International Journal of Neuropsychopharmacology, Vol. 17, Issue. 06, p. 851.


    Boulougouris, Vasileios Malogiannis, Ioannis Lockwood, George Zervas, Iannis and Di Giovanni, Giuseppe 2013. Serotonergic modulation of suicidal behaviour: integrating preclinical data with clinical practice and psychotherapy. Experimental Brain Research, Vol. 230, Issue. 4, p. 605.


    Hemmings, Sian Megan Joanna Lochner, Christine van der Merwe, Lize Cath, Danielle C. Seedat, Soraya and Stein, Dan J. 2013. BDNF Val66Met modifies the risk of childhood trauma on obsessive-compulsive disorder. Journal of Psychiatric Research, Vol. 47, Issue. 12, p. 1857.


    Ionescu, Dawn F. Niciu, Mark J. Mathews, Daniel C. Richards, Erica M. and Zarate, Carlos A. 2013. NEUROBIOLOGY OF ANXIOUS DEPRESSION: A REVIEW. Depression and Anxiety, Vol. 30, Issue. 4, p. 374.


    Peyrot, Wouter J. Middeldorp, Christel M. Jansen, Rick Smit, Johannes H. de Geus, Eco.J.C. Hottenga, Jouke-Jan Willemsen, Gonneke Vink, Jacqueline M. Virding, Susanne Barragan, Isabel Ingelman-Sundberg, Magnus Sim, Sarah C. Boomsma, Dorret I. and Penninx, Brenda W.J.H. 2013. Strong effects of environmental factors on prevalence and course of major depressive disorder are not moderated by 5-HTTLPR polymorphisms in a large Dutch sample. Journal of Affective Disorders, Vol. 146, Issue. 1, p. 91.


    Tomoda, Akemi Nishitani, Shota Matsuura, Naomi Fujisawa, Takashi X Kawatani, Junko Toyohisa, Daiki Ono, Mai and Shinohara, Kazuyuki 2013. No interaction between serotonin transporter gene (5-HTTLPR) polymorphism and adversity on depression among Japanese children and adolescents. BMC Psychiatry, Vol. 13, Issue. 1,


    Willemsen, Gonneke Vink, Jacqueline M. Abdellaoui, Abdel den Braber, Anouk van Beek, Jenny H. D. A. Draisma, Harmen H. M. van Dongen, Jenny van ‘t Ent, Dennis Geels, Lot M. van Lien, Rene Ligthart, Lannie Kattenberg, Mathijs Mbarek, Hamdi de Moor, Marleen H. M. Neijts, Melanie Pool, Rene Stroo, Natascha Kluft, Cornelis Suchiman, H. Eka D. Slagboom, P. Eline de Geus, Eco J. C. and Boomsma, Dorret I. 2013. The Adult Netherlands Twin Register: Twenty-Five Years of Survey and Biological Data Collection. Twin Research and Human Genetics, Vol. 16, Issue. 01, p. 271.


    Homberg, Judith R. and van den Hove, Daniel L.A. 2012. The serotonin transporter gene and functional and pathological adaptation to environmental variation across the life span. Progress in Neurobiology, Vol. 99, Issue. 2, p. 117.


    Kuepper, Y. Wielpuetz, C. Alexander, N. Mueller, E. Grant, P. and Hennig, J. 2012. 5-HTTLPR S-allele: a genetic plasticity factor regarding the effects of life events on personality?. Genes, Brain and Behavior, Vol. 11, Issue. 6, p. 643.


    Lockwood, George and Perris, Poul 2012. The Wiley-Blackwell Handbook of Schema Therapy.


    Schillani, Giulia Era, Daniel Cristante, Tania Mustacchi, Giorgio Richiardi, Martina Grassi, Luigi and Giraldi, Tullio 2012. 5-HTTLPR polymorphism and anxious preoccupation in early breast cancer patients. Radiology and Oncology, Vol. 46, Issue. 4,


    ×

The Serotonin Transporter Gene Length Polymorphism (5-HTTLPR) and Life Events: No Evidence for an Interaction Effect on Neuroticism and Anxious Depressive Symptoms

  • Christel M. Middeldorp (a1), Eco J. C. de Geus (a2), Gonneke Willemsen (a3), Jouke-Jan Hottenga (a4), P. Eline Slagboom (a5) and Dorret I. Boomsma (a6)
  • DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1375/twin.13.6.544
  • Published online: 01 February 2012
Abstract

The finding of a significant gene by environment interaction effect on depression of the serotonin transporter length polymorphism (5-HTTLPR) and the Number of experienced Life Events (NLE) was not replicated in two large meta-analyses (Munafo et al., 2009; Risch et al., 2009). These meta-analyses have been criticized on the grounds that large studies that get most weight in meta-analyses have the poorest measurement quality of life events and, as a consequence, do not find an effect. Another issue is the time frame across which the NLE are measured. Proximal life events appear to be better predictors of depression than more distal events. We present the results of analyses of the 5-HTTLPR × NLE effect on anxious depression and neuroticism scores in a sample of 1,155 twins and their parents and siblings from 438 families. The interaction effect was tested separately for NLE experienced across the life span and NLE experienced in the past year. There was a significant main effect of NLE on anxious depression and neuroticism, especially when these were experienced in the past year. No interaction with 5-HTTLPR was found for NLE either experienced across the life span or across the past year. Our results support the two recent meta-analyses. Given recent insights from genome wide association studies, it seems more useful to focus on the joint effect of several genes, that are, for example, part of the same biological pathway, in interaction with the environment, than on one candidate gene.

    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      The Serotonin Transporter Gene Length Polymorphism (5-HTTLPR) and Life Events: No Evidence for an Interaction Effect on Neuroticism and Anxious Depressive Symptoms
      Your Kindle email address
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      The Serotonin Transporter Gene Length Polymorphism (5-HTTLPR) and Life Events: No Evidence for an Interaction Effect on Neuroticism and Anxious Depressive Symptoms
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      The Serotonin Transporter Gene Length Polymorphism (5-HTTLPR) and Life Events: No Evidence for an Interaction Effect on Neuroticism and Anxious Depressive Symptoms
      Available formats
      ×
Copyright
Corresponding author
*Address for correspondence: Christel Middeldorp, Department of Biological Psychology, VU University Amsterdam, Van der Boechorststraat 1, 1081 BT, Amsterdam, the Netherlands.
Recommend this journal

Email your librarian or administrator to recommend adding this journal to your organisation's collection.

Twin Research and Human Genetics
  • ISSN: 1832-4274
  • EISSN: 1839-2628
  • URL: /core/journals/twin-research-and-human-genetics
Please enter your name
Please enter a valid email address
Who would you like to send this to? *
×

Keywords: