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The Invention of the Passport
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  • Cited by 24
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    This book has been cited by the following publications. This list is generated based on data provided by CrossRef.

    DuFord, Rochelle 2017. Must a world government violate the right to exit?. Ethics & Global Politics, Vol. 10, Issue. 1, p. 19.


    Leslie, Camilo Arturo 2016. Territoriality, map-mindedness, and the politics of place. Theory and Society, Vol. 45, Issue. 2, p. 169.


    Casas-Cortes, Maribel Cobarrubias, Sebastian and Pickles, John 2015. Riding Routes and Itinerant Borders: Autonomy of Migration and Border Externalization. Antipode, Vol. 47, Issue. 4, p. 894.


    Tyrrell, Ian 2015. Transnational Nation. p. 132.

    Kivisto, Peter 2015. Transnationalism in a State-Centered Framework. Sociological Forum, Vol. 30, Issue. 4, p. 1129.


    Aylward, Erin Abu-Zahra, Nadia and Giles, Audrey 2015. Mobility and Nunavut Inuit youth: lessons from Northern Youth Abroad. Journal of Youth Studies, Vol. 18, Issue. 5, p. 553.


    2015. Neutral Accent. p. 137.

    Pfoser, Alena 2015. Between Security and Mobility: Negotiating a Hardening Border Regime in the Russian-Estonian Borderland. Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies, Vol. 41, Issue. 10, p. 1684.


    Martin, Jeffrey T. 2014. The Confucian ethic and the spirit of East Asian police: a comparative study in the ideology of democratic policing. Crime, Law and Social Change, Vol. 61, Issue. 4, p. 461.


    Giles, Howard Ota, Hiroshi and Foley, Megan 2013. Tourism: an intergroup communication model with Russian inflections. Russian Journal of Communication, Vol. 5, Issue. 3, p. 229.


    Waldinger, Roger Soehl, Thomas and Lim, Nelson 2012. Emigrants and the Body Politic Left Behind: Results from the Latino National Survey. Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies, Vol. 38, Issue. 5, p. 711.


    Zolberg, Aristide R. 2012. Why Not the Whole World? Ethical Dilemmas of Immigration Policy. American Behavioral Scientist, Vol. 56, Issue. 9, p. 1204.


    Magder, Ted 2011. The Handbook of Global Media and Communication Policy. p. 21.

    Menz, Georg 2011. Neo-Liberalism, Privatization and the Outsourcing of Migration Management: A Five-Country Comparison. Competition & Change, Vol. 15, Issue. 2, p. 116.


    Couton, Philippe and López, José Julián 2009. Movement as utopia. History of the Human Sciences, Vol. 22, Issue. 4, p. 93.


    Robertson, Craig 2009. A DOCUMENTARY REGIME OF VERIFICATION. Cultural Studies, Vol. 23, Issue. 3, p. 329.


    Wimmer, Andreas 2009. Herder's Heritage and the Boundary-Making Approach: Studying Ethnicity in Immigrant Societies. Sociological Theory, Vol. 27, Issue. 3, p. 244.


    ROBERTSON, CRAIG 2009. Four Documents, a Non-Citizen, and a Diplomatic Controversy: The Documentation of Identity in the Mid-Nineteenth Century. Journal of Historical Sociology, Vol. 22, Issue. 4, p. 476.


    Reicher, Stephen Haslam, S. Alexander and Rath, Rakshi 2008. Making a Virtue of Evil: A Five-Step Social Identity Model of the Development of Collective Hate. Social and Personality Psychology Compass, Vol. 2, Issue. 3, p. 1313.


    Löwenheim, Oded 2007. The Responsibility to Responsibilize: Foreign Offices and the Issuing of Travel Warnings. International Political Sociology, Vol. 1, Issue. 3, p. 203.


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    The Invention of the Passport
    • Online ISBN: 9780511520990
    • Book DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511520990
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Book description

In order to distinguish between those who may and may not enter or leave, states everywhere have developed extensive systems of identification, central to which is the passport. This innovative book argues that documents such as passports, internal passports and related mechanisms have been crucial in making distinctions between citizens and non-citizens. It examines how the concept of citizenship has been used to delineate rights and penalties regarding property, liberty, taxes and welfare. It focuses on the US and Western Europe, moving from revolutionary France to the Napoleonic era, the American Civil War, the British industrial revolution, pre-World War I Italy, the reign of Germany's Third Reich and beyond. This innovative study combines theory and empirical data in questioning how and why states have established the exclusive right to authorize and regulate the movement of people.

Reviews

‘With the world awash in refugees, immigrants, ‘guest workers’, travellers, and the occasional terrorist, an interpretative study of identity papers and passports is certainly timely - the more so since even as the administrative reach of individual states keeps growing with modern technology, international norms of human rights and a movement toward open borders in Europe work, ostensibly, to limit state power … The historical sociologist John Torpey is well equipped to address these issues … his canvass is wide and does ample justice to his subject.’

Source: The American Historical Review

‘In this insightful, carefully documented, and analytically astute account, Torpey has laid out for us with elegance and clarity the history of the passport and the ‘révolution identificatoire’ of which it is an integral part. His theoretically sensitive treatment is essential to our understanding of the modern state system.’

Source: Journal of Modern History

‘In this groundbreaking exploration of the passport’s vicissitudes from the French Revolution to the present time, Torpey argues convincingly that the passport is important to our understanding of the nature of the state and the state system.’

Source: American Journal of Sociology

‘In this insightful, carefully documented, and analytically astute account, Torpey has laid out for us with elegance and clarity the history of the passport and the ‘revolution identificatoire’ of which it is an integral part. His theoretically sensitive treatment is essential to our understanding of the modern state system. What Torpey has accomplished here is to have denaturalized, by close historical analysis, the utterly taken-for-granted, contemporary regime of passports.’

James Scott Source: Journal of Modern History

‘The ingenuity of this book is evident in the focus on the passport. This document represents a kind of sociological Geiger counter for all sorts of far-reaching social and political tensions – tensions arising from endemic struggles between state power and individuals’ own notions of where they want to go and where they prefer to remain … The Invention of the Passport is not just about passports, but also about the interests engaged in their use … [an] excellent achievement.’

Source: Politics, Social Movements and the State

‘In this insightful, carefully documents, and analytically astute account, Torpey has laid out for us with elegance and clarity the history of the passport and the ‘révolution identificatoire’ of which it is an integral part. His theoretically sensitive treatment is essential to our understanding of the modern state system.’

Source: Journal of Management History

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