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History is the largest single subject area for the Press. It is a programme with both depth and breadth, ranging in subject matter from late antiquity to the present day, international in scope and embracing new approaches. Our publishing includes major reference series, textbooks and monographs, as well as a collection of distinguished journals affiliated to the world’s leading scholarly societies. Together, they reflect the diversity of the discipline and offer an unmatched resource for today’s historians.

Explore History journals

History blog

  • Why Revisit the Early Modern Canon?
  • 16 August 2018, Lisa Shapiro
  • The thing about canons is that they seem sacred. Challenging them, even revisiting them, can seem heretical. Facing these facts is the first step in addressing...
  • The Tudor banquet: digital text mining reveals new information
  • 14 August 2018, Louise Stewart
  • This blog accomapnies Louise Stewart’s Historical Journal article ‘Social Status and Classicism in the Visual and Material Culture of the Sweet Today, the term ‘banquet’ is commonly used to refer to any lavish feast.  However, in the Tudor and Stuart period the word had a different, and very specific meaning, referring to a separate meal which consisted solely of sweet foods.  In September 1591, for example, Queen Elizabeth I visited the Earl of Hertford at his estate at Elvetham.  The lavish entertainments provided for the queen during her four day stay included water pageants, fireworks, feasts and a glittering ‘banquet’.  A printed account of the entertainment makes it clear that this banquet was no ordinary meal.  It was served in the garden after supper, ‘all in glass and silver’ and accompanied by a spectacular fireworks display.  The queen was presented with a thousand sweet dishes including sculptural sugar work representing her arms, castles and forts, human figures and mythical and exotic animals as well as preserved fruits and other confections.  This elaborate spectacle was typical of the sweet banquet.…...

News

  • 2017 Dorothy Ross Award winning article
  • 01 Jun 2017,
  • Dr Nick Witham's article published in the Historical Journal entitled “Popular History, Postwar Liberalism, and the Role of the Public Intellectual in Richard Hofstadter’s The American Political Tradition,” has won the 2017 Dorothy Ross Award.