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  • Cited by 6
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    This chapter has been cited by the following publications. This list is generated based on data provided by CrossRef.

    Ugolini, Stefano 2018. Handbook of the History of Money and Currency. p. 1.

    Klovland, Jan Tore and Øksendal, Lars Fredrik 2017. The decentralized central bank: bank rate autonomy and capital market integration in Norway, 1850–1892. European Review of Economic History, Vol. 21, Issue. 3, p. 259.

    Ugolini, Stefano 2017. The Evolution of Central Banking: Theory and History. p. 101.

    Ugolini, Stefano 2017. The Evolution of Central Banking: Theory and History. p. 207.

    QUINN, STEPHEN and ROBERDS, WILLIAM 2015. Responding to a Shadow Banking Crisis: The Lessons of 1763. Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Vol. 47, Issue. 6, p. 1149.

    Flandreau, Marc and Geisler Mesevage, Gabriel 2014. The separation of information and lending and the rise of rating agencies in the USA (1841–1907). Scandinavian Economic History Review, Vol. 62, Issue. 3, p. 213.

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  • Print publication year: 2013
  • Online publication date: April 2013

Three - Where It All Began: Lending of Last Resort at the Bank of England Monitoring During the Overend-Gurney Panic of 1866

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