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Quasi-States
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  • Cited by 47
  • Cited by
    This book has been cited by the following publications. This list is generated based on data provided by CrossRef.

    Souleimanov, Emil Aslan Abrahamyan, Eduard and Aliyev, Huseyn 2018. Unrecognized states as a means of coercive diplomacy? Assessing the role of Abkhazia and South Ossetia in Russia’s foreign policy in the South Caucasus. Southeast European and Black Sea Studies, Vol. 18, Issue. 1, p. 73.

    Balthasar, Dominik 2018. On the (In)Compatibility of Peace-Building and State-Making: Evidence from Somaliland. The Journal of Development Studies, p. 1.

    Schia, Niels Nagelhus 2018. Franchised States and the Bureaucracy of Peace. p. 23.

    Hodzi, Obert 2018. China and Africa: economic growth and a non-transformative political elite. Journal of Contemporary African Studies, Vol. 36, Issue. 2, p. 191.

    Cole, Wade M. 2018. Does might make right or fight? Coercive capacity, democracy, and human rights, 1975 to 2010. Journal of Human Rights, Vol. 17, Issue. 2, p. 147.

    Balthasar, Dominik 2017. ‘Peace-building as state-building’? Rethinking liberal interventionism in contexts of emerging states. Conflict, Security & Development, Vol. 17, Issue. 6, p. 473.

    Malejacq, Romain 2017. From Rebel to Quasi-State: Governance, Diplomacy and Legitimacy in the Midst of Afghanistan’s Wars (1979–2001). Small Wars & Insurgencies, Vol. 28, Issue. 4-5, p. 867.

    Butcher, Charles 2017. Geography and the outcomes of civil resistance and civil war. Third World Quarterly, Vol. 38, Issue. 7, p. 1454.

    Mason, Robert 2017. China’s impact on the landscape of African International Relations: implications for dependency theory. Third World Quarterly, Vol. 38, Issue. 1, p. 84.

    Liang, Xuecun 2016. Nationalism inside out: an ethical review. Economic and Political Studies, Vol. 4, Issue. 2, p. 122.

    Soguk, Nevzat 2015. With/Out a State, Kurds Rising: The Un/Stated Foreign Policy and the Rise of the Kurdish Regional Government in Iraq. Globalizations, Vol. 12, Issue. 6, p. 957.

    Broers, Laurence 2015. Resourcing de facto jurisdictions: A theoretical perspective on cases in the South Caucasus. Caucasus Survey, Vol. 3, Issue. 3, p. 269.

    Balthasar, Dominik 2015. From Hybridity to Standardization: Rethinking State-Making in Contexts of Fragility. Journal of Intervention and Statebuilding, Vol. 9, Issue. 1, p. 26.

    Legro, Jeffrey W. 2015. America, China, and the Struggle for World Order. p. 19.

    Richards, Rebecca and Smith, Robert 2015. Playing in the sandbox: state building in the space of non-recognition. Third World Quarterly, Vol. 36, Issue. 9, p. 1717.

    Yemelianova, Galina M. 2015. Western academic discourse on the post-Soviet de facto state phenomenon. Caucasus Survey, Vol. 3, Issue. 3, p. 219.

    Vaha, Milla Emilia 2015. Drowning under: Small island states and the right to exist. Journal of International Political Theory, Vol. 11, Issue. 2, p. 206.

    Acharya, Amitav 2011. Norm Subsidiarity and Regional Orders: Sovereignty, Regionalism, and Rule-Making in the Third World1. International Studies Quarterly, Vol. 55, Issue. 1, p. 95.

    Pupavac, Vanessa 2005. Human security and the rise of global therapeutic governance. Conflict, Security & Development, Vol. 5, Issue. 2, p. 161.

    Chandler, David 2004. The problems of ‘nation‐building’: imposing bureaucratic ‘rule from above’. Cambridge Review of International Affairs, Vol. 17, Issue. 3, p. 577.

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    Quasi-States
    • Online ISBN: 9780511559020
    • Book DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511559020
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Book description

In this book, Professor Robert Jackson develops an original interpretation of Third World underdevelopment, explaining it in terms of international relations and law. He describes Third World countries as 'quasi-states', arguing that they are states in name only, demonstrating how international changes during the post-1945 period made it possible for many quasi-states to be created and to survive despite the fact that they are usually inefficient, illegitimate and domestically unstable.

Reviews

‘This is an important book which ought to be read by all scholars studying Third World states … What Jackson does so well in this book is highlight the contradictory strands of theory and practice in world politics.’

Source: Politikon

‘Robert Jackson has written a clever and subtle account of the incorporation of Third World countries, after decolonization, into the state system … bringing the Third World into the theoretical mainstream and demonstrating that the normative superstructure of the state system is itself a potent source of Third World behaviour, both nationally and also domestically.’

Source: Journal of Modern Asian Studies

‘Robert Jackson’s illuminating study adds considerably to our understanding of the diverse and complex practices that are so often conflated as a simple claim to sovereignity. It is a major addition to a burgeoning literature that has begun to treat sovereignity as a multidimensional and strenuously contested puzzle rather than a simple fact of life.’

R. B. J. Walker Source: Canadian Journal of Political Science

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