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  • Print publication year: 2014
  • Online publication date: May 2014

Section 3 - Plasticity after injury to the central nervous system

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Textbook of Neural Repair and Rehabilitation
  • Online ISBN: 9780511995583
  • Book DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511995583
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