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The Cambridge Companion to <I>Frankenstein</I>
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    The Cambridge Companion to Frankenstein
    • Online ISBN: 9781316091203
    • Book DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9781316091203
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Book description

The Cambridge Companion to Frankenstein consists of sixteen original essays on Mary Shelley's novel by leading scholars, providing an invaluable introduction to Frankenstein and its various critical contexts. Theoretically informed but accessibly written, this volume relates Frankenstein to various social, literary, scientific and historical contexts, and outlines how critical theories such as ecocriticism, posthumanism, and queer theory generate new and important discussion in illuminating ways. The volume also explores the cultural afterlife of the novel including its adaptations in various media such as drama, film, television, graphic novels, and literature aimed at children and young adults. Written by an international team of leading experts, the essays provide new insights into the novel and the various critical approaches which can be applied to it. The volume is an essential guide to students and academics who are interested in Frankenstein and who wish to know more about its complex literary history.

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This list contains references from the content that can be linked to their source. For a full set of references and notes please see the PDF or HTML where available.


Percy Bysshe Shelley , The Letters of Percy Bysshe Shelley, ed. Frederick L. Jones , 2 vols. (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1964), Vol. I, p. 549

Steven Earl Forry (ed.), Hideous Progenies: Dramatizations of Frankenstein from Mary Shelley to the Present (Philadelphia, PA: University of Pennsylvania Press, 1990)

Nora Crook , ‘Work in Mary Shelley's Journals’, Keats–Shelley Review, 18 (2004), 123–37

Jessica Richard , ‘“A Paradise of My Own Creation”: Frankenstein and the Improbable Romance of Polar Exploration’, Nineteenth-Century Contexts, 25(4) (2003): 295314

Adriana Craciun , ‘Writing the Disaster: Franklin and Frankenstein’, Nineteenth-Century Literature 65(4) (March 2011), 433–80, 440

Johanne Lamoureux . ‘Frankenstein et Les Ruines de Volney: l’Éducation littéraire de la Créature’, Protée 35(2) (2007), 6573

John B. Lamb , ‘Mary Shelley's Frankenstein and Milton's Monstrous Myth’, Nineteenth-Century Literature 47(3) (1992), 303–19

Susan J. Wolfson , ‘Mary Wollstonecraft and the Poets’, in Claudia L. Johnson (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Mary Wollstonecraft (Cambridge University Press, 2002) pp. 167–77

H. L. Malchow , ‘Frankenstein's Monster and Images of Race in Nineteenth-Century Britain’, Past and Present, 139 (1993), 90130

Alan Richardson , ‘From Emile to Frankenstein: The Education of Monsters’, European Romantic Review, 1 (1991), 147–62, 151

James O' Rourke , ‘“Nothing More Unnatural”: Mary Shelley's Revision of Rousseau’, ELH, 56 (1989), 543–69

Miranda Burgess Transporting Frankenstein: Mary Shelley's Mobile Figures’, European Romantic Review, 25(3) (2014), 247–65

Jessica Richard , ‘“A Paradise of My Own Creation”: Frankenstein and the Improbable Romance of Polar Exploration’ in Nineteenth-Century Contexts: An Interdisciplinary Journal, 25(4) (2003), 295314, 296

Howard Malchow , ‘Frankenstein's Monster and Images of Race in Nineteenth-Century Britain’, Past and Present, 139 (1993) 90130

Anne Mellor , ‘Frankenstein, Racial Science, and the Yellow Peril’, Nineteenth Century Contexts, 23(1) (2001) 128

Fred Randel The Political Geography of Horror in Mary Shelley's Frankenstein’, ELH, 70(2) (2003), 465491, 482–3

Adriana Craciun , Introduction to Writing Arctic Disaster: Authorship and Exploration (Cambridge University Press, 2016)

Dale Townshend and Angela Wright , ‘Gothic and Romantic Engagements: The Critical Reception of Ann Radcliffe, 1789–1850’ in Townshend and Wright (eds.), Ann Radcliffe, Romanticism and the Gothic (Cambridge University Press, 2014), pp. 332

Diana Wallace and Andrew Smith (eds.), The Female Gothic: New Directions (Basingstoke: Palgrave, 2009)

Bette London , ‘Mary Shelley, Frankenstein, and the Spectacle of Masculinity’, PMLA, 108(2) (March 1993), 253–65

Allan Lloyd Smith , ‘“This Thing of Darkness”: Racial Discourse in Mary Shelley's Frankenstein’, Gothic Studies, 6(2) (November 2004), 208–22

Allan Lloyd Smith , ‘“This Thing of Darkness”: Racial Discourse in Mary Shelley's Frankenstein’, Gothic Studies, 6(2) (November 2004), 208222

Anne-Lise François , ‘“Oh Happy Living Things”: Frankenfoods and the Bounds of Wordsworthian Natural Piety’, diacritics, 33(2) (2005), 4270

Steven Earl Forry (ed.), Hideous Progenies: Dramatizations of Frankenstein from Mary Shelley to the Present (Philadelphia, PA: University of Pennsylvania Press, 1990) pp. 135–60

Emma Raub , ‘Frankenstein and the Mute Figure of Melodrama’, Modern Drama, 55(4) (2012), 437–58, 441

Kevin Heffernan , Ghouls, Gimmicks and Gold: Horror Films and the American Movie Business, 1953–1968 (Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2004)

Adriana Craciun . ‘Writing the Disaster: Franklin and Frankenstein’. Nineteenth-Century Literature 65 (2011) 433–80.

Denise Gigante . ‘Facing the Ugly: The Case of Frankenstein’. ELH, 67 (2000), 565–87.

Jessica Richard . ‘“A Paradise of My Own Creation”: Frankenstein and the Improbable Romance of Polar Exploration’. Nineteenth-Century Contexts 25 (2003): 295314.

Sharon Rushton . Shelley and Vitality. Basingstoke: Palgrave, 2005.

Max Fincher . Queering the Gothic in the Romantic Age: The Penetrating Eye. Basingstoke: Palgrave, 2007.

George E. Haggerty Queer Gothic. Urbana and Chicago, IL: University of Illinois Press, 2006.

N. Katherine Hayles . How We Became Posthuman: Virtual Bodies in Cybernetics, Literature, and Informatics. University of Chicago Press, 1999.

D Gooderham . ‘Children's Fantasy Literature: Toward an Anatomy’. Children's Literature in Education, 26(3) (1995), 171183.

Lee. Grieveson Policing Cinema: Movies and Censorship in Early Twentieth-Century America. Berkeley, CA: University of California Press, 2004.

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