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The Subject of Virtue
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  • Cited by 34
  • Cited by
    This book has been cited by the following publications. This list is generated based on data provided by CrossRef.

    Bear, Laura 2017. Anthropological futures: for a critical political economy of capitalist time. Social Anthropology, Vol. 25, Issue. 2, p. 142.


    Emmerich, Nathan 2017. Finding Common Ground: Consensus in Research Ethics Across the Social Sciences. Vol. 1, Issue. , p. 125.

    WEISS, ERICA 2017. Competing ethical regimes in a diverse society: Israeli military refusers. American Ethnologist, Vol. 44, Issue. 1, p. 52.


    Dow, Katharine and Boydell, Victoria 2017. Introduction: Nature and Ethics Across Geographical, Rhetorical and Human Borders. Ethnos, Vol. 82, Issue. 1, p. 1.


    Neumark, Tom 2017. ‘A good neighbour is not one that gives’: detachment, ethics, and the relational self in Kenya. Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute,


    Nielsen, Mikka 2017. Structuring the Self: Moral Implications of Getting an ADHD Diagnosis. Ethnos, p. 1.


    Brown, Hannah Reed, Adam and Yarrow, Thomas 2017. Introduction: towards an ethnography of meeting. Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute, Vol. 23, Issue. S1, p. 10.


    Reed, Adam 2017. An office of ethics: meetings, roles, and moral enthusiasm in animal protection. Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute, Vol. 23, Issue. S1, p. 166.


    Reed, Adam 2017. Snared: Ethics and Nature in Animal Protection. Ethnos, Vol. 82, Issue. 1, p. 68.


    Roux, Sébastien and Vozari, Anne-Sophie 2017. Parents at their best: The ethopolitics of family bonding in France. Ethnography, p. 146613811668759.


    Pop, Simion 2017. ‘I’ve tempted the saint with my prayer!’ Prayer, charisma and ethics in Romanian eastern orthodox Christianity. Religion, Vol. 47, Issue. 1, p. 73.


    Bazzul, Jesse 2017. The ‘subject of ethics’ and educational research OR Ethics or politics? Yes please!. Educational Philosophy and Theory, Vol. 49, Issue. 10, p. 995.


    Schielke, Samuli 2017. There will be Blood: Expectation and Ethics of Violence during Egypt’s Stormy Season. Middle East Critique, Vol. 26, Issue. 3, p. 205.


    Robinson, Simon 2016. The Practice of Integrity in Business. p. 127.

    Calvão, Filipe 2016. Unfree Labor. Annual Review of Anthropology, Vol. 45, Issue. 1, p. 451.


    Eastwood, James 2016. ‘Meaningful service’: Pedagogy at Israeli pre-military academies and the ethics of militarism. European Journal of International Relations, Vol. 22, Issue. 3, p. 671.


    McKearney, Patrick 2016. The Genre of Judgment. Journal of Religious Ethics, Vol. 44, Issue. 3, p. 544.


    Simoni, Valerio 2016. Economization, moralization, and the changing moral economies of ‘capitalism’ and ‘communism’ among Cuban migrants in Spain. Anthropological Theory, Vol. 16, Issue. 4, p. 454.


    Zeiderman, Austin 2016. Prognosis past: the temporal politics of disaster in Colombia. Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute, Vol. 22, Issue. S1, p. 163.


    Brown, Bernardo E. 2016. Routines of morality: Nurturing familiar values in unfamiliar lands. Ethnography, Vol. 17, Issue. 1, p. 3.


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    The Subject of Virtue
    • Online ISBN: 9781139236232
    • Book DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9781139236232
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Book description

The anthropology of ethics has become an important and fast-growing field in recent years. This book argues that it represents not just a new subfield within anthropology but a conceptual renewal of the discipline as a whole, enabling it to take account of a major dimension of human conduct which social theory has so far failed adequately to address. An ideal introduction for students and researchers in anthropology and related human sciences.• Shows how ethical concepts such as virtue, character, freedom and responsibility may be incorporated into anthropological analysis• Surveys the history of anthropology's engagement with morality • Examines the relevance for anthropology of two major philosophical approaches to moral life.

Reviews

‘James Laidlaw's book, which has the advantage of being elegantly written, is bound to transform the anthropological study of morality and ethics. Along the way, he helps us rethink many of our most important ideas, models and theories, including those related to practice, to relativism, to agency and - above all - to freedom.’

Charles Stafford - London School of Economics and Political Science

‘Clearly argued, beautifully written and brilliant, this book will become a foundational text in the new anthropology of morality - an anthropology that is both ethically responsible and philosophically deep.’

T. M. Luhrmann - Stanford University

‘This is the kind of game-changing book we have been waiting for in the anthropology of ethics. Theoretically astute, philosophically wide-ranging, and dazzling in its use of ethnographic materials, all intellectually ambitious anthropologists will want to read it. And philosophers who have made great efforts recently to render their arguments psychologically realistic now have a perfect place to turn to begin to engage the social aspects of their subject matter with equal care.’

Joel Robbins - University of California, San Diego

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