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Evolution of secure services for women in England

  • Jaydip Sarkar and Mary di Lustro

Summary

Patients detained at high and medium security reveal significant gender differences in the presentation of psychopathology, mental disorder and social and offending profiles. However, secure mental health services in England, like prisons, generally fail to recognise the core importance of the differing biopsychosocial development in women and the impact of life experiences on women's subsequent biopsychosocial functioning. As a consequence, women are often inadequately provided for in services dictated by the identified needs, risks and responsiveness of men. The lack of clinically appropriate facilities for women may account for the increased frequency with which women are readmitted to medium security and for their longer admissions to both high and medium secure care. New tertiary services are developing as a result of the lessons learnt while providing gender-blind care. However, further development is required to ensure that women receive services of the same quality, range and nature of those received by men.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

Dr Jaydip Sarkar, East Midlands Centre for Forensic Mental Health, Arnold Lodge, Cordelia Close, Leicester LE5 0LE, UK. E-mail: jay.sarkar@nottshc.nhs.uk

Footnotes

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Declaration of Interest

None.

Footnotes

References

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BJPsych Advances
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Evolution of secure services for women in England

  • Jaydip Sarkar and Mary di Lustro
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