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Resisting psychotropic medicines: a synthesis of qualitative studies of medicine-taking

  • Nicky Britten, Ruth Riley and Myfanwy Morgan
Summary

This article reports the results of a synthesis of qualitative research articles about lay perspectives on prescribed psychotropic medicines. It updates and elaborates on a model of medicine-taking developed by Pound and colleagues. In this model, the concept of resistance refers to the various ways in which people take prescribed medicines while trying to minimise their intake. The synthesis included 12 papers published since 1992. The findings are presented at the societal level, in terms of the social meanings of mental health problems and medication, and at the individual level; the latter covers active engagement and lay evaluation, as well as the outcomes of evaluation, including the doctor–patient relationship. Although it can be difficult to achieve in the current clinical environment, there is much scope for developing more concordant relationships with patients in relation to prescribing and using psychotropic medicines.

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Corresponding author
Myfanwy Morgan, King's College London (Guy's Campus), Department of Primary Care and Public Health Sciences, Capital House, Weston Street, London SE1 3QD. Email: myfanwy.morgan@kcl.ac.uk
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Declaration of Interest

None.

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References
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BJPsych Advances
  • ISSN: 1355-5146
  • EISSN: 1472-1481
  • URL: /core/journals/bjpsych-advances
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Resisting psychotropic medicines: a synthesis of qualitative studies of medicine-taking

  • Nicky Britten, Ruth Riley and Myfanwy Morgan
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