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What a general practitioner can expect from a consultant psychiatrist

  • Alastair F. Wright
Extract

There are many similarities in the experience and approach of general practitioners (GPs) and psychiatrists. GPs may spend some time in psychiatric posts before settling down as principals in their own practice, while some psychiatrists are members of both their own College and the Royal College of General Practitioners. Although there is great potential benefit for patients in this symbiotic relationship, GPs and psychiatrists work in different settings that require different techniques and time-scales. The professional work of both specialities has been profoundly affected by the National Health Service (NHS) reorganisation of the early 1990s. GPs have developed new relationships not only with psychiatric colleagues, but also with professionals of other disciplines such as psychologists, social workers and counsellors.

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References
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BJPsych Advances
  • ISSN: 1355-5146
  • EISSN: 1472-1481
  • URL: /core/journals/bjpsych-advances
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What a general practitioner can expect from a consultant psychiatrist

  • Alastair F. Wright
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