Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
×
Home

Defining and Redefining U.S.-Africa Trade Relations During the Trump Presidency

  • Stephen Lande (a1) and Dennis Matanda (a2)

Extract

In an era in which multilateral trade arrangements have garnered more public notoriety than ever before, the suboptimal trade and investment relationship between America and Africa, as underpinned by the African Growth and Opportunity Act (AGOA), is one of the less controversial ones. AGOA could nevertheless use some adjustments or augmentations to facilitate deeper U.S.-Africa commercial relations. For instance, adjusting AGOA's origin rules could nudge the private sector on both sides of the Atlantic towards gains for U.S. and African employment and the reduction of trade deficits. Africa must leverage the period before AGOA expires to redefine its trade relationship with the United States in innovative ways. The United States should welcome these measures, since the type of value that Africa would add to the global supply chain would not replace the high-quality jobs that the Trump Administration would like to see in the United States. In fact, this type of production would make U.S. manufacturing more competitive.

  • View HTML
    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Defining and Redefining U.S.-Africa Trade Relations During the Trump Presidency
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Defining and Redefining U.S.-Africa Trade Relations During the Trump Presidency
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Defining and Redefining U.S.-Africa Trade Relations During the Trump Presidency
      Available formats
      ×

Copyright

This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

References

Hide All

1 Ryan McCormick, The African Growth and Opportunity Act: The Perils of Pursuing African Development Through U.S. Trade Law, 41 Tex. Int'l L.J. 339 (2006) (suggesting that one reason that Congress watered down AGOA was that the pro-African constituency had not meaningfully countered protectionist arguments for saving American jobs).

2 Trade Preferences Extension Act of 2015, 114 Pub. L. No. 27, 129 Stat. 362 (2015).

4 See Data: Chinese Loans to Africa, China Africa Research Initiative.

5 David Dollar, China's Engagement with Africa: From Natural Resources to Human Resources 13–19 (China Center at Brookings, 2016).

6 See Heather Long, China Is Crushing the U.S. in “Economic Warfare”, CNN (June 30, 2016).

7 See Data: China-Africa Trade, China Africa Research Initiative.

8 See AGOA.info.

9 Reuben Brigety, Trump's Deafening Silence on Africa, Foreign Pol'y (Feb. 15, 2017).

10 See Robert Blackwill & Jennifer Harris, War by Other Means (2016).

12 Simon Mevel et al., The African Growth and Opporunity Act: An Empirical Analysis of the Possibilities Post-2015 (Africa Growth Initiative at Brookings & United Nations Economic Commission for Africa, July 2013).

13 Dani Rodrik, Premature Deindustrialization, 21 J Econ. Growth, 1 (2016). See also Dani Rodrik, Is Liberal Democracy Feasible in Developing Countries?, 51 Stud. Comp. Int'l Dev. 50 (2016).

14 See Mevel et al., supra note 12.

16 United Nations Econ. Comm'n for Africa, supra note 3, at 83.

Recommend this journal

Email your librarian or administrator to recommend adding this journal to your organisation's collection.

AJIL Unbound
  • ISSN: -
  • EISSN: 2398-7723
  • URL: /core/journals/american-journal-of-international-law
Please enter your name
Please enter a valid email address
Who would you like to send this to? *
×

Metrics

Altmetric attention score

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed