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Effect of feeding lambs with a tanniferous shrub (rockrose) and a vegetable oil blend on fatty acid composition of meat lipids

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  16 June 2016

A. Francisco
Affiliation:
Centro de Investigação Interdisciplinar em Sanidade Animal (CIISA), Avenida da Universidade Técnica, 1300-477 Lisbon, Portugal Faculdade de Medicina Veterinária, Universidade de Lisboa (ULisboa), 1300-477 Lisbon, Portugal Unidade Estratégica de Investigação e Serviços em Produção e Saúde Animal, Instituto Nacional de Investigação Agrária e Veterinária (INIAV), 2005-048 Vale de Santarém, Portugal
S. P. Alves
Affiliation:
Centro de Investigação Interdisciplinar em Sanidade Animal (CIISA), Avenida da Universidade Técnica, 1300-477 Lisbon, Portugal Faculdade de Medicina Veterinária, Universidade de Lisboa (ULisboa), 1300-477 Lisbon, Portugal
P. V. Portugal
Affiliation:
Unidade Estratégica de Investigação e Serviços em Produção e Saúde Animal, Instituto Nacional de Investigação Agrária e Veterinária (INIAV), 2005-048 Vale de Santarém, Portugal
V. M. R. Pires
Affiliation:
Centro de Investigação Interdisciplinar em Sanidade Animal (CIISA), Avenida da Universidade Técnica, 1300-477 Lisbon, Portugal Faculdade de Medicina Veterinária, Universidade de Lisboa (ULisboa), 1300-477 Lisbon, Portugal
M. T. Dentinho
Affiliation:
Unidade Estratégica de Investigação e Serviços em Produção e Saúde Animal, Instituto Nacional de Investigação Agrária e Veterinária (INIAV), 2005-048 Vale de Santarém, Portugal
C. M. Alfaia
Affiliation:
Centro de Investigação Interdisciplinar em Sanidade Animal (CIISA), Avenida da Universidade Técnica, 1300-477 Lisbon, Portugal Faculdade de Medicina Veterinária, Universidade de Lisboa (ULisboa), 1300-477 Lisbon, Portugal
E. Jerónimo
Affiliation:
Centro de Investigação Interdisciplinar em Sanidade Animal (CIISA), Avenida da Universidade Técnica, 1300-477 Lisbon, Portugal Centro de Biotecnologia Agrícola e Agro-Alimentar do Alentejo (CEBAL), Instituto Politécnico de Beja (IPBeja), 7801-908 Beja, Portugal
J. A. M. Prates
Affiliation:
Centro de Investigação Interdisciplinar em Sanidade Animal (CIISA), Avenida da Universidade Técnica, 1300-477 Lisbon, Portugal Faculdade de Medicina Veterinária, Universidade de Lisboa (ULisboa), 1300-477 Lisbon, Portugal
J. Santos-Silva
Affiliation:
Centro de Investigação Interdisciplinar em Sanidade Animal (CIISA), Avenida da Universidade Técnica, 1300-477 Lisbon, Portugal Unidade Estratégica de Investigação e Serviços em Produção e Saúde Animal, Instituto Nacional de Investigação Agrária e Veterinária (INIAV), 2005-048 Vale de Santarém, Portugal
R. J. B. Bessa*
Affiliation:
Centro de Investigação Interdisciplinar em Sanidade Animal (CIISA), Avenida da Universidade Técnica, 1300-477 Lisbon, Portugal Faculdade de Medicina Veterinária, Universidade de Lisboa (ULisboa), 1300-477 Lisbon, Portugal
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Abstract

The effects of feeding Cistus ladanifer (Cistus) and a blend of soybean and linseed oil (1 : 2 vol/vol) on fatty acid (FA) composition of lamb meat lipids and messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of desaturase enzymes was assessed. In total, 54 male lambs were randomly assigned to 18 pens and to nine diets, resulting from the combination of three inclusion levels of Cistus (50 v. 100 v. 200 g/kg of dry matter (DM)) and three inclusion levels of oil (0 v. 40 v. 80 g/kg of DM). The forage-to-concentrate ratio of the diets was 1 : 1. Longissimus muscle lipids were extracted, fractionated into neutral (NL) and polar lipid (PL) and FA methyl esters obtained and analyzed by GLC. The expression of genes encoding Δ5, Δ6 and Δ9 desaturases (fatty acid desaturase 1 (FADS1), fatty acid desaturase 2 (FADS2) and stearoyl CoA desaturase (SCD)) was determined. Intramuscular fat, NL and PL contents were not affected by oil or Cistus. Oil supplementation reduced (P<0.05) 16:0, c9-16:1, 17:0, c9-17:1 and c9-18:1 FA and increased (P<0.05) 18:2n-6, 18:3n-3 and the majority of biohydrogenation intermediates in NL. Cistus alone had few effects on FA of NL but interacted with oil (P<0.05) by increasing t10-18:1,t10,t12-18:2,t10,c12-18:2 and t7,c9-18:2. The t10-/t11-18:1 ratio increased with both Cistus and oil levels. The c9, t11-18:2 did not increase (P<0.05) with both oil and Cistus dietary inclusion. Oil reduced c9-16:1, 17:0, c9-17:1,c9-18:1, 20:4n-6, 22:4n-6 and 20:3n-9 proportions in PL, and increased 18:2n-6, 18:3n-3, 20:3n-3 and of most of the biohydrogenation intermediates. The Cistus had only minor effects on FA composition of PL. Cistus resulted in a reduction (P<0.05) of 20:5n-3 and 22:6n-3 in the meat PL. The expression level of SCD mRNA increased (P=0.015) with Cistus level, although a linear relationship with condensed tannins intake (P=0.11) could not be established. FADS1 mRNA expressed levels increased linearly (P=0.019) with condensed tannins intake. In summary, the inclusion of Cistus and oil in 1 : 1 forage-to-concentrate ratio diets resulted in a large increase in t10-18:1 and no increase in c9,t11-18:2 or n-3 long chain poor in polyunsaturated fatty acids in lamb meat.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
© The Animal Consortium 2016 

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