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The Staffordshire (Ogley Hay) hoard: recovery of a treasure

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 January 2015

Kevin Leahy
Affiliation:
National Advisor to the Portable Antiquities Scheme, British Museum, Great Russell Street, LondonWC1B 3DG, UK (Email: k.leahy@btinternet.com)
Roger Bland
Affiliation:
Head of Portable Antiquities and Treasure, British Museum, Great Russell Street, London WC1B 3DG, UK (Email: rbland@thebritishmuseum.ac.uk)
Della Hooke
Affiliation:
Independent researcher, 91 Oakfield Road, Selly Park, Birmingham B29 7HL, UK (Email: della.hooke@blueyonder.co.uk)
Alex Jones
Affiliation:
Birmingham Archaeology, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT, UK (Email: a.e.jones.anh@bham.ac.uk)
Elisabeth Okasha
Affiliation:
Language Centre, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland (Email: e.okasha@ucc.ie)

Extract

The Staffordshire (Ogley Hay) hoard was found on the 5–10 July 2009 by Mr Terry Herbert while metal-detecting on arable land at a site in south Staffordshire in the English Midlands (Figure 1).Mr Herbert contacted Duncan Slarke, the Portable Antiquities Scheme's Finds Liaison Officer for Staffordshire and the West Midlands, who visited the finder at his home and prepared an initial list of 244 bags of finds. These were then taken to Birmingham Museum and HM Coroner was informed. Duncan Slarke also contacted the relevant archaeological authorities including English Heritage, the Staffordshire Historic Environment Record, the Potteries Museum, Stoke-on-Trent, Birmingham Museum & Art Gallery and the Portable Antiquities & Treasure Department at the British Museum. A meeting was held in Birmingham on 21 July at which it was agreed that the controlled recovery of the remaining objects of the hoard and an archaeological investigation of the findspot was a priority. It was also agreed that one of the Portable Antiquities Scheme's National Advisors, Dr Kevin Leahy, should compile a hand-list of finds in preparation for the Coroner's Inquest.

Type
Research article
Copyright
Copyright © Antiquity Publications Ltd 2011

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