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Late Pleistocene estuaries, palaeoecology and humans on North America's Pacific Coast

  • Jon Erlandson (a1), Torben Rick (a2), Amira Ainis (a1), Todd Braje (a3), Kristina Gill (a1) and Leslie Reeder-Myers (a4)...

Abstract

Human use of estuarine shellfish and other coastal marsh resources began on California's Santa Rosa Island at least 11 800–11 100 years ago. Productive estuaries in California and elsewhere in the Americas were present by the Late Pleistocene, providing shellfish, waterfowl, fish and seaweeds that attracted some of the First Americans.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

*Author for correspondence (Email: tbraje@sdsu.edu)

References

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Keywords

Late Pleistocene estuaries, palaeoecology and humans on North America's Pacific Coast

  • Jon Erlandson (a1), Torben Rick (a2), Amira Ainis (a1), Todd Braje (a3), Kristina Gill (a1) and Leslie Reeder-Myers (a4)...

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