Skip to main content
×
Home
    • Aa
    • Aa
  • Access
  • Cited by 80
  • Cited by
    This article has been cited by the following publications. This list is generated based on data provided by CrossRef.

    Almeida, Sara M. Silva, Larissa C. Cardoso, Maíra R. Cerqueira, Pablo V. Juen, Leandro and Santos, Marcos P. D. 2016. The effects of oil palm plantations on the functional diversity of Amazonian birds. Journal of Tropical Ecology, p. 1.


    Española, C.P. Collar, N.J. Mallari, N.A.D. and Marsden, S.J. 2016. Large avian frugivores in the Philippines show linear responses to improvements in forest quality. Forest Ecology and Management, Vol. 375, p. 127.


    Kerfahi, Dorsaf Tripathi, Binu M. Dong, Ke Go, Rusea and Adams, Jonathan M. 2016. Rainforest Conversion to Rubber Plantation May Not Result in Lower Soil Diversity of Bacteria, Fungi, and Nematodes. Microbial Ecology, Vol. 72, Issue. 2, p. 359.


    Langenberger, Gerhard Cadisch, Georg Martin, Konrad Min, Shi and Waibel, Hermann 2016. Rubber intercropping: a viable concept for the 21st century?. Agroforestry Systems,


    Linder, Joshua M. and Palkovitz, Rachel E. 2016. Ethnoprimatology.


    Mandal, Jaydev and Shankar Raman, T. R. 2016. Shifting agriculture supports more tropical forest birds than oil palm or teak plantations in Mizoram, northeast India. The Condor, Vol. 118, Issue. 2, p. 345.


    Mayr, Gerald 2016. The early Eocene birds of the Messel fossil site: a 48 million-year-old bird community adds a temporal perspective to the evolution of tropical avifaunas. Biological Reviews,


    Rittiboon, Kua and Tongkumchum, Phattrawan 2016. Using linear regression to measure bird abundance. Environment, Development and Sustainability,


    Saswattecha, Kanokwan Hein, Lars Kroeze, Carolien and Jawjit, Warit 2016. Effects of oil palm expansion through direct and indirect land use change in Tapi river basin, Thailand. International Journal of Biodiversity Science, Ecosystem Services & Management, p. 1.


    Sreekar, Rachakonda Huang, Guohualing Yasuda, Mika Quan, Rui-Chang Goodale, Eben Corlett, Richard T. and Tomlinson, Kyle W. 2016. Effects of forests, roads and mistletoe on bird diversity in monoculture rubber plantations. Scientific Reports, Vol. 6, p. 21822.


    Srinivas, Alicia and Koh, Lian Pin 2016. Oil palm expansion drives avifaunal decline in the Pucallpa region of Peruvian Amazonia. Global Ecology and Conservation, Vol. 7, p. 183.


    Styring, Alison R. Ragai, Roslina Zakaria, Mohamed and Sheldon, Frederick H. 2016. Foraging ecology and occurrence of 7 sympatric babbler species (Timaliidae) in the lowland rainforest of Borneo and peninsular Malaysia. Current Zoology, Vol. 62, Issue. 4, p. 345.


    Turner, Edgar C. and Snaddon, Jake L. 2016. Biological and Environmental Hazards, Risks, and Disasters.


    Wu, Junen Liu, Wenjie and Chen, Chunfeng 2016. Below-ground interspecific competition for water in a rubber agroforestry system may enhance water utilization in plants. Scientific Reports, Vol. 6, p. 19502.


    WU, FEI LIU, LUMING FANG, JIANLING ZHANG, RENGONG and YANG, XIAOJUN 2016. Conservation value of human-modified forests for birds in mountainous regions of south-west China. Bird Conservation International, p. 1.


    Azhar, Badrul Saadun, Norzanalia Puan, Chong Leong Kamarudin, Norizah Aziz, Najjib Nurhidayu, Siti and Fischer, Joern 2015. Promoting landscape heterogeneity to improve the biodiversity benefits of certified palm oil production: Evidence from Peninsular Malaysia. Global Ecology and Conservation, Vol. 3, p. 553.


    Azhar, Badrul Puan, Chong Leong Aziz, Najjib Sainuddin, Muhammad Adila, Nurfatin Samsuddin, Sohaimi Asmah, Siti Syafiq, Muhamad Razak, Syafiq A. Hafizuddin, Ahmad Hawa, Ainil and Jamian, Syari 2015. Effects of in situ habitat quality and landscape characteristics in the oil palm agricultural matrix on tropical understory birds, fruit bats and butterflies. Biodiversity and Conservation, Vol. 24, Issue. 12, p. 3125.


    Davies, Tammy E. Clarke, Rohan H. Ewen, John G. Fazey, Ioan R. A. Pettorelli, Nathalie and Cresswell, Will 2015. The effects of land-use change on the endemic avifauna of Makira, Solomon Islands: endemics avoid monoculture. Emu, Vol. 115, Issue. 3, p. 199.


    Fagan, Matthew DeFries, Ruth Sesnie, Steven Arroyo-Mora, J. Soto, Carlomagno Singh, Aditya Townsend, Philip and Chazdon, Robin 2015. Mapping Species Composition of Forests and Tree Plantations in Northeastern Costa Rica with an Integration of Hyperspectral and Multitemporal Landsat Imagery. Remote Sensing, Vol. 7, Issue. 5, p. 5660.


    Gallmetzer, Nina and Schulze, Christian H. 2015. Impact of oil palm agriculture on understory amphibians and reptiles: A Mesoamerican perspective. Global Ecology and Conservation, Vol. 4, p. 95.


    ×

Changes in bird communities following conversion of lowland forest to oil palm and rubber plantations in southern Thailand

  • SIRIRAK ARATRAKORN (a1), SOMYING THUNHIKORN (a2) and PAUL F. DONALD (a3)
  • DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0959270906000062
  • Published online: 03 May 2006
Abstract

This paper describes changes in bird communities following the conversion of lowland forest to commercial oil palm and rubber plantations. Conversion of forest to plantations resulted in a reduction in species richness of at least 60%, with insectivores and frugivores suffering greater losses than more omnivorous species. Of the 128 species recorded across all habitats, 84% were recorded in forest, and 60% were recorded only in that habitat. Of the 16 Globally Threatened or Near-Threatened species recorded in the study, 15 were recorded only in forest. Species occurring in plantations were significantly more widespread in Thailand than species recorded only in forests and had a tendency towards smaller body size. Species richness in plantations was unaffected by plantation age or distance from nearest forest edge, but was significantly greater where undergrowth was allowed to regenerate beneath the crop trees. Bird communities in oil palm and rubber plantations were extremely similar, and there was a strong positive correlation across species in their relative abundance in each plantation type. The results indicate that a high proportion of species formerly present in the region are unable to adapt to conversion of forest to oil palm and rubber plantations, resulting in large losses of bird species and family richness and the replacement of species with restricted ranges and high conservation status by those with extensive ranges and low conservation status. Initiatives that reduce pressure to clear new land for plantations, for example by increasing productivity in existing plantations and improving protected area networks, are likely to be more effective in conserving threatened forest birds than initiatives to improve conditions within plantations, though both should be encouraged.

    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Changes in bird communities following conversion of lowland forest to oil palm and rubber plantations in southern Thailand
      Your Kindle email address
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Changes in bird communities following conversion of lowland forest to oil palm and rubber plantations in southern Thailand
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Changes in bird communities following conversion of lowland forest to oil palm and rubber plantations in southern Thailand
      Available formats
      ×
Copyright
Corresponding author
Author to whom correspondence should be sent.
Recommend this journal

Email your librarian or administrator to recommend adding this journal to your organisation's collection.

Bird Conservation International
  • ISSN: 0959-2709
  • EISSN: 1474-0001
  • URL: /core/journals/bird-conservation-international
Please enter your name
Please enter a valid email address
Who would you like to send this to? *
×