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Human rights in psychiatric practice: an overview for clinicians

  • Brendan D. Kelly
Summary

Matters relating to human rights arise in almost every area of psychiatric practice. Although some statements of rights are non-binding declarations (e.g. the United Nations' Principles for the Protection of Persons with Mental Illness and the Improvement of Mental Health Care), others are legally binding (e.g. the European Convention on Human Rights) and actively shape national laws. Persons with mental illness commonly experience violations of rights, including their economic and social rights. Psychiatrists can promote human rights through high-quality, evidence-based clinical practice; patient-centred service management; social awareness and engagement; and international activism to enhance protection and promotion of the rights of people with mental illnesses at global level.

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Copyright
Corresponding author
Professor Brendan D. Kelly, Associate Clinical Professor of Psychiatry, Department of Adult Psychiatry, UCD School of Medicine and Medical Science, University College Dublin, Mater Misericordiae University Hospital, 62/63 Eccles Street, Dublin 7, Ireland. Email: brendankelly35@gmail.com
Footnotes
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Learning Objectives

Appreciate the background to human rights in psychiatric practice Understand key declarations on human rights as they pertain to psychiatry Appreciate the ways in which psychiatrists can promote human rights through clinical practice, service management, social engagement and international activism

Declaration of Interest

None

Footnotes
References
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BJPsych Advances
  • ISSN: 2056-4678
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Human rights in psychiatric practice: an overview for clinicians

  • Brendan D. Kelly
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