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Caregiver burden and distress following the patient's discharge from psychiatric hospital

  • Veronica Ranieri (a1), Kevin Madigan (a2), Eric Roche (a3), David McGuinness (a4), Emma Bainbridge (a4), Larkin Feeney (a2), Brian Hallahan (a4), Colm McDonald (a4) and Brian O'Donoghue (a5) (a6)...
Abstract
Aims and method

Caring for someone with a mental illness is increasingly occurring within the community. As a result, family members who fulfil a caregiving role may experience substantial levels of burden and psychological distress. This study investigates the level of burden and psychological distress reported by caregivers after the patient's admission.

Results

This study found that the overall level of burden and psychological distress experienced by caregivers did not differ according to the patient's legal status. However, the caregivers of those who were voluntarily admitted supervised the person to a significantly greater extent than the caregivers of those who were involuntarily admitted. Approximately 15% of caregivers revealed high levels of psychological distress.

Clinical implications

This study may emphasise a need for mental health professionals to examine the circumstances of caregivers, particularly of those caring for patients who are voluntarily admitted, a year after the patient's admission.

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Copyright
This is an open-access article published by the Royal College of Psychiatrists and distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Corresponding author
Correspondence to Brian O'Donoghue (briannoelodonoghue@gmail.com)
Footnotes
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Declaration of interest

None.

Footnotes
References
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BJPsych Bulletin
  • ISSN: 2056-4694
  • EISSN: 2056-4708
  • URL: /core/journals/bjpsych-bulletin
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Caregiver burden and distress following the patient's discharge from psychiatric hospital

  • Veronica Ranieri (a1), Kevin Madigan (a2), Eric Roche (a3), David McGuinness (a4), Emma Bainbridge (a4), Larkin Feeney (a2), Brian Hallahan (a4), Colm McDonald (a4) and Brian O'Donoghue (a5) (a6)...
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