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Experiences of ward rounds among in-patients on an acute mental health ward: a qualitative exploration

  • Reed Cappleman (a1), Zandra Bamford (a2), Clare Dixon (a3) and Hayley Thomas (a2)
Abstract
Aims and method

To address the gap in qualitative research examining patients' experiences of ward rounds. In-depth interviews were conducted with five in-patients on an acute mental health ward. Data were analysed using thematic analysis.

Results

Data were organised into three first-order themes, positioned within an overarching theme relating to patients' perceptions of the use of power and control within ward rounds.

Clinical implications

Systemic factors may make it difficult to facilitate ward rounds in a manner which leaves patients feeling fully empowered or in control, but there are practical measures to address these issues, drawn from participants' accounts.

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Copyright
This is an open-access article published by the Royal College of Psychiatrists and distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Corresponding author
Correspondence to Reed Cappleman (reed.cappleman@swyt.nhs.uk)
Footnotes
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See Bulletin comment, p. 260, this issue.

Declaration of interest

None.

Footnotes
References
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1 Royal College of Psychiatrists. Accreditation for Inpatient Mental Health Services (AIMS). RCPsych, 2010.
2 Foster, H, Falkowski, W, Rollings, J. A survey of patients' attitudes towards inpatient psychiatric ward rounds. Int J Soc Psychiatry 1991; 37: 135–40.
3 Labib, P, Brownell, L. Factors affecting patient satisfaction with the psychiatric ward round: retrospective cross-sectional study. Psychiatr Bull 2009; 33: 295–8.
4 White, R, Karim, B. Patients' views of the ward round: a survey. Psychiatr Bull 2005; 29: 207–9.
5 Milner, G, Jankovic, J, Hoosen, I, Marrie, D. Patients and staff understanding of general adult psychiatry ward rounds. J Ment Health 2008; 17: 492–7.
6 Braun, V, Clarke, V. Using thematic analysis in psychology. Qual Res Psychology 2006; 3: 77101.
7 Saldaϸpa, J. The Coding Manual for Qualitative Researchers, 2nd edn. Sage, 2012.
8 Armond, J, Armond, A. Patients' attitude to multi-disciplinary psychiatric assessments. Br J Clin Soc Psychiatry 1985; 3: 3641.
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BJPsych Bulletin
  • ISSN: 2056-4694
  • EISSN: 2056-4708
  • URL: /core/journals/bjpsych-bulletin
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Experiences of ward rounds among in-patients on an acute mental health ward: a qualitative exploration

  • Reed Cappleman (a1), Zandra Bamford (a2), Clare Dixon (a3) and Hayley Thomas (a2)
Submit a response

eLetters

Ward Rounds - what a bad idea

Adam Moliver, Retired Old Age Psychiatrist, None
04 October 2015

Cappleman et al (1) address the matter of “Ward Rounds”.

In over twenty years working with inpatients (in Old Age Psychiatry) I never did a ward round:

1. The term is taken from medical/surgical practice. We do not actually go round the ward - instead the patient comes to us.

2. It is multi-disciplinary meeting at which the patient may or may not be present.

3. The consultant or ward doctor (and other MDT members) should see the patient frequently enough to know the mental state, wishes, hopes, fears etc. The consultant should see the patient after the meeting to convey any major issues - other staff can feedback on lesser matters.

The round should not be the only time the patient gets to see the Consultant.

4. If the patient wishes to be party to this large discussion so be it, but we must recognise that it may not be, at least for some, the best way to build trust, encourage discourse or assess a patient.

5. Given the stamina required for some “Ward Rounds” and the time taken, we should have a more searching consideration of this issue.

Reference:

1. Cappleman R et al. Experiences of ward rounds among in-patients on an acute mental health ward: a qualitative exploration. BJPsych Bull 2015

DOI: 10.1192/pb.bp.113.046409
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Conflict of interest: None Declared

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