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Mind how you cross the gap! Outcomes for young people who failed to make the transition from child to adult services: the TRACK study

  • Zoebia Islam (a1), Tamsin Ford (a2), Tami Kramer (a3), Moli Paul (a4), Helen Parsons (a4), Katherine Harley (a5), Tim Weaver (a6), Susan McLaren (a7) and Swaran P. Singh (a4)...
Abstract
Aims and method

The Transitions of Care from Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services to Adult Mental Health Services (TRACK) study was a multistage, multicentre study of adolescents' transitions between child and adult mental health services undertaken in England. We conducted a secondary analysis of the TRACK study data to investigate healthcare provision for young people (n = 64) with ongoing mental health needs, who were not transferred from child and adolescent mental health services (CAMHS) to adult mental health services mental health services (AMHS).

Results

The most common outcomes were discharge to a general practitioner (GP; n =29) and ongoing care with CAMHS (n = 13), with little indication of use of third-sector organisations. Most of these young people had emotional/neurotic disorders (n = 31, 48.4%) and neurodevelopmental disorders (n = 15, 23.4%).

Clinical implications

GPs and CAMHS are left with the responsibility for the continuing care of young people for whom no adult mental health service could be identified. GPs may not be able to offer the skilled ongoing care that these young people need. Equally, the inability to move them decreases the capacity of CAMHS to respond to new referrals and may leave some young people with only minimal support.

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Copyright
This is an open-access article published by the Royal College of Psychiatrists and distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Corresponding author
Correspondence to Zoebia Islam (z.islam@warwick.ac.uk)
Footnotes
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Declaration of interest

None.

Footnotes
References
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Mind how you cross the gap! Outcomes for young people who failed to make the transition from child to adult services: the TRACK study

  • Zoebia Islam (a1), Tamsin Ford (a2), Tami Kramer (a3), Moli Paul (a4), Helen Parsons (a4), Katherine Harley (a5), Tim Weaver (a6), Susan McLaren (a7) and Swaran P. Singh (a4)...
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