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Online psychotherapy: trailblazing digital healthcare

  • Annabel McDonald (a1), Jessica A. Eccles (a1), Sanaz Fallahkhair (a2) and Hugo D. Critchley (a1)

Abstract

Advances in digital technology have a profound impact on conventional healthcare systems. We examine the trailblazing use of online interventions to enable autonomous psychological care which can greatly enhance individual- and population-level access to services. There is strong evidence supporting online cognitive–behavioural therapy and more engaging programmes are now appearing so as to reduce user ‘attrition’. The next generation of autonomous psychotherapy programmes will implement adaptive and personalised responses, moving beyond impersonalised advice on cognitive and behavioural techniques. This will be a more authentic form of psychotherapy that integrates therapy with the actual relationship experiences of the individual user.

Declaration of Interest

None.

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Copyright

This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Dr Annabel McDonald (jinny.mcdonald@nhs.net)

References

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Online psychotherapy: trailblazing digital healthcare

  • Annabel McDonald (a1), Jessica A. Eccles (a1), Sanaz Fallahkhair (a2) and Hugo D. Critchley (a1)
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