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Some notes on approaches to regulatory capital assessment for insurance firms

  • C. Turnbull
Abstract

The intellectual climate around financial solvency regulation has changed markedly since the global financial crisis, especially with regard to the usefulness of market prices, the desirability of principle-based solvency assessment, the feasibility of a probabilistic approach to produce accurate capital estimates, and indeed whether solvency assessment should be risk-sensitive at all. This short paper provides some reflective notes on approaches to solvency capital assessment for insurance firms in this context.

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Copyright
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted reuse, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Corresponding author
*Correspondence to: Craig Turnbull, 15 Blacket Place, Edinburgh EH9 1RJ, UK. E-mail: craig.turnbull78@gmail.com
References
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British Actuarial Journal
  • ISSN: 1357-3217
  • EISSN: 2044-0456
  • URL: /core/journals/british-actuarial-journal
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