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Work-integrated learning in university popular music programmes: localised approaches to vocational curricula in Melbourne, Australia and Wellington, Aotearoa/New Zealand

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  27 April 2020

Catherine Hoad*
Affiliation:
School of Music and Creative Media Production, College of Creative Arts, Massey University, Wellington6021, Aotearoa/New Zealand
Oli Wilson
Affiliation:
School of Music and Creative Media Production, College of Creative Arts, Massey University, Wellington6021, Aotearoa/New Zealand
Shelley Brunt
Affiliation:
School of Media and Communication, RMIT University, GPO Box 2476, Melbourne, VIC3001, Australia
Gene Shill
Affiliation:
School of Media and Communication, RMIT University, GPO Box 2476, Melbourne, VIC3001, Australia
Ben Howe
Affiliation:
School of Music and Creative Media Production, College of Creative Arts, Massey University, Wellington6021, Aotearoa/New Zealand
*
Corresponding author. Email: c.hoad@massey.ac.nz

Abstract

This article investigates the possibilities of a vocational pedagogy for undergraduate popular music education which is grounded in site and city. The value of work-integrated curricula in tertiary music environments is well established; however, often absent from such discussions is consideration of how geospatial contexts mediate the opportunities and resources available to universities. In response, we provide a critical comparison of how work-integrated learning (WIL) has been developed in two undergraduate popular music degrees in Australia and Aotearoa/New Zealand. Through comparison, we consider how the geographic locations of both programmes have shaped WIL, as well as identifying the specific economic, cultural and political tensions that emerge.

Type
Articles
Copyright
© Cambridge University Press 2020

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