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Bioethics in human nutrigenomics research: European Nutrigenomics Organisation workshop report

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  08 March 2007

Manuela M. Bergmann*
Affiliation:
Department of Epidemiology, German Institute of Human Nutrition, Potsdam-Rehbrücke, Germany
Marek Bodzioch
Affiliation:
Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Medical College, Jagiellonian University, Poland
M. Luisa Bonet
Affiliation:
Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Nutrition and Biotechnology, University of the Balearic Islands, Palma de Mallorca, Spain
Catherine Defoort
Affiliation:
Facultë de mëdicine Timone, UMR INSERM, France
Georg Lietz
Affiliation:
School of Clinical Medical Sciences, Human Nutrition Research Centre, University of Newcastle, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE2 4HH, UK
John C. Mathers
Affiliation:
School of Clinical Medical Sciences, Human Nutrition Research Centre, University of Newcastle, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE2 4HH, UK
*
*Corresponding author: Dr Manuela M Bergmann, fax +49 33200 88721, emailbergmann@mail.dife.de
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Abstract

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As part of its work on setting standards and establishing guidelines for nutrigenomics research, the European Nutrigenomics Organisation (NuGO) is developing bioethical guidelines for those engaged in human nutrigenomics studies. A NuGO working group developed a set of draft guidelines addressing four areas: (1) information and consenting prior to a nutrigenomicsstudy; (2) the generation and use of genotype information; (3) the establishment and maintenance of biobanks; (4) the exchange of samples and data. NuGO convened a workshop with a panel of invited external experts to assess the draft guidelines. The panel of experts confirmedthat these areas are important and that the development of specific bioethical guidelines for nutrigenomics research would therefore enhance the application of established international guidelines in this field of biomedical research.

Type
Workshop Report
Copyright
Copyright © The Nutrition Society 2006

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