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Oxidised cholesterol is more hypercholesterolaemic and atherogenic than non-oxidised cholesterol in hamsters

  • Chi Ho Ng (a1), Xiao Qiang Yao (a2), Yu Huang (a2) and Zhen-Yu Chen (a1)
Abstract

The present study was to test the relative hypercholesterolaemic and atherogenic potency of oxidised cholesterol (OxC) and non-oxidised cholesterol in hamsters. An OxC mixture, prepared by heating pure cholesterol (100 g) at 160°C in air for 72 h, contained 78 % cholesterol and 22 % OxC. Fifty Golden Syrian hamsters were randomly divided into five groups of ten animals and fed the control diet, a 0·05 % cholesterol diet (C-0·05), a 0·10 % cholesterol diet (C-0·1), a 0·05 % OxC mixture diet (OxC-0·05) or a 0·10 % OxC mixture diet (OxC-0·1), respectively. The OxC-0·05 and OxC-0·1 groups were more hypercholesterolaemic and had serum total cholesterol 22 and 12 % higher than the corresponding C-0·05 and C-0·1 hamsters (P < 0·05). The OxC-0·1 group demonstrated greater deposition of cholesterol and had a larger area of atherosclerotic plaque in the aorta than the corresponding C-0·1 hamsters (P < 0·05). Similarly, the aorta in the OxC-0·1 group showed greater inhibition on acetylcholine-induced relaxation compared with that in the C-0·1 hamsters. It was concluded that OxC was much more hypercholesterolaemic and atherogenic than cholesterol.

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Corresponding author
*Corresponding author: Dr Zhen-Yu Chen, fax +852 2603 7246, email zhenyuchen@cuhk.edu.hk
References
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British Journal of Nutrition
  • ISSN: 0007-1145
  • EISSN: 1475-2662
  • URL: /core/journals/british-journal-of-nutrition
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