Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-55597f9d44-zdfhw Total loading time: 0.294 Render date: 2022-08-19T08:25:35.621Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true } hasContentIssue true

The effect of acidosis on the labelling of urinary ammonia during infusion of [amide-15N]glutamine in human subjects

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  09 March 2007

J. C. Waterlow
Affiliation:
Department of Public Health and Policy, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, Keppel Street, London WClE 7HT
A. A. Jackson
Affiliation:
Institute of Human Nutrition, University of Southampton, Bassett Crescent East, Southampton SO9 3TU
M. H. N. Golden
Affiliation:
Tropical Metabolism Research Unit, University of West Indies, Jamaica, West Indies
F. Jahoor
Affiliation:
Tropical Metabolism Research Unit, University of West Indies, Jamaica, West Indies
G. Sutton
Affiliation:
Institute of Human Nutrition, University of Southampton, Bassett Crescent East, Southampton SO9 3TU
E. B. Fern
Affiliation:
Nestec Ltd, Vevey, Switzerland
Rights & Permissions[Opens in a new window]

Abstract

HTML view is not available for this content. However, as you have access to this content, a full PDF is available via the ‘Save PDF’ action button.

In three experiments [amide-15N]glutamine was infused intravenously in male volunteers. After 4–8 h of infusion acidosis was achieved by an oral dose of CaCl2 (1 mmol/kg). In one subject acidosis was maintained for 5 d. The acid load produced an approximately 3-fold increase in urinary NH3 excretion, with a small (approximately 20%) and transient increase in the isotope abundance of urinary NH3 Estimates of glutamine production rate (flux) were obtained in two experiments. There was no evidence that it was increased in acidosis. The extra NH3 production by the kidney represented only a very small part, about 3%, of the total glutamine production rate.

Type
Labelling of urinary ammonia in glutamine infusion
Copyright
Copyright © The Nutrition Society 1994

References

Areas, J., Balian, S., Slemmer, D., Belledonne, M. & Preuss, H. G. (1987). Renal ammoniagenesis following glutamine loading in intact dogs during acute metabolic acid-base perturbations. Clinical Science 72, 6169.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Catzeflis, C., Schiitz, Y., Micheli, J. L., Welsch, C., Amaud, M. J. & Jequier, E. (1985). Whole body protein synthesis and energy expenditure in very low birth weight infants. Pediatric Research 19, 679687.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Cersosimo, E., Williams, P. E., Radosevich, P. M., Hoxworth, B. T., Lacy, W. W. & Abumrad, N. N. (1986). Role of glutamine in adaptations in nitrogen metabolism during fasting. American Journal of Physiology 250, E622E628.Google ScholarPubMed
Darmaun, D., Matthews, D. E. & Bier, D. M. (1986). Glutamine and glutamate kinetics in humans. American Journal of Physiology 251, E117E126.Google ScholarPubMed
Darmaun, D., Matthews, D. E. & Bier, D. M. (1988). Physiological hypercortisolemia increases proteolysis, glutamine and alanine production. American Journal of Physiology 255, E366E373.Google Scholar
de Benoist, B., Jackson, A. A., Hall, J. St E. & Persand, C. (1985). Whole-body protein turnover in Jamaican women during normal pregnancy. Human Nutrition: Clinical Nutrition 39C, 167180.Google Scholar
Dutra, S., Thuillier, F., Darmaun, D., Messing, B., Rongier, M. & Desjeux, J. F. (1992). Protein turnover assessed by leucine and glutamine fluxes in adult coeliac patients. Clinical Nutrition 11, Suppl., 50.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Fern, E. B. & Garlick, P. J. (1983). The rate of nitrogen metabolism in the whole body of man measured with 15N-glycine and uniformly labelled 15N-wheat. Human Nutrition: Clinical Nutrition 37C, 91107.Google Scholar
Fern, E. B., Garlick, P. J. & Waterlow, J. C. (1985 a). The concept of the single body pool of metabolic nitrogen in determining the rate of whole body nitrogen turnover. Human Nutrition: Clinical Nutrition 39C, 8599.Google Scholar
Fern, E. B., Garlick, P. J. & Waterlow, J. C. (1985 b). Apparent compartmentation of body nitrogen in one human subject: its consequences in measuring the rate of whole-body protein synthesis with 16N. Clinical Science 68, 271282.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Golden, M. H. N., Jahoor, P. & Jackson, A. A. (1982). Glutamine production rate and its contribution to urinary ammonia in normal man. Clinical Science 62, 299305.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Golden, M. H. N. & Waterlow, J. C. (1977). Total protein synthesis in elderly people: a comparison of results with [15N] glycine and [14C] leucine. Clinical Science 53, 277288.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Goldstein, L., Schrock, H. & Cha, C.-J. (1980). Relationship of muscle glutamine production to renal ammonia metabolism. Biochemical Society Transactions 8, 509510.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Häussinger, D., Gerok, W. & Sies, H. (1984). Hepatic role in pH regulation: role of the intercellular glutamine cycle. Trends in Biochemical Sciences 9, 300302.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Heitmann, R. N. & Bergman, E. N. (1978). Glutamine metabolism, inter-organ transport and glucogenicity in the sheep. American Journal of Physiology 234, E197–203.Google Scholar
Jackson, A. A., Golden, M. H. N., Byfield, R., Jahoor, F., Royes, J. & Soutter, L. (1983). Whole body protein turnover and nitrogen balance in young children at intakes of protein and energy in the region of maintenance. Human Nutrition: Clinical Nutrition 37C, 433446.Google Scholar
Kaplan, A. (1965). Urea nitrogen and urinary ammonia. In Methods in Clinical Chemistry, vol. 5, p. 245 [Meites, S., editor]. New York: Academic Press.Google Scholar
Lotspeich, W. D. (1967). Metabolic aspects of acid-base change. Science 155, 1066.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Matthews, D. E., Marano, M. A. & Campbell, R. G. (1993). Splanchnic bed utilization of glutamine and glutamic acid in humans. American Journal of Physiology 264, E848E854.Google ScholarPubMed
Monson, J. P., Henderson, R. M., Smith, J. A., Iles, R. A., Faus-Deder, M., Carter, N. D., Heath, R., Metcalfe, H. K. & Cohen, R. D. (1984). The mechanism of inhibition of ureogenesis by acidosis. Bioscience Reports 4, 819825.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Oster, J. R., Hotchkiss, J. L., Carbon, M., Farmer, M. & Vaamonde, C. (1975). A short duration renal acidification test using calcium chloride. Nephron 14, 281292.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Owen, E. E. & Robinson, R. R. (1963). Amino acid extraction and ammonia metabolism by the human kidney during the prolonged administration of ammonium chloride. Journal of Clinical Investigation 42, 263276.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Pitts, R. F. & Pilkington, L. A. (1966). The relation between plasma concentrations of glutamine and glycine and utilization of their nitrogen as sources of urinary ammonia. Journal of Clinical Investigation 45, 8693.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Pitts, R. F., Pilkington, L. A. & DeHaas, J. M. C. (1965). 15N tracer studies on the origin of urinary ammonia in the acidotic dog with notes on the enzymatic synthesis of labelled glutamic acid and glutamine. Journal of Clinical Investigation 44, 731745.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Schrock, H. & Goldstein, L. (1981). Interorgan relationships for glutamine metabolism in normal and acidotic rats. American Journal of Physiology 240, E519–525.Google ScholarPubMed
Soares, M.J., Piers, L. S., Shetty, P. S., Robinson, S., Jackson, A. A. & Waterlow, J. C. (1991). Basal metabolic rate, body composition and whole-body protein turnover in Indian men with differing nutritional status. Clinical Science 81, 419425.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Squires, E. J. & Brosnan, J. T. (1983). Measurements of the turnover rate of glutamine in normal and acidotic rats. Biochemical Journal 210, 277280.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Squires, E. J., Hall, D. E. & Brosnan, J. T. (1976). Arteriovenous differences for amino acids and lactate across kidneys of normal and acidotic rats. Biochemical Journal 160, 125128.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Tizianello, A., De Ferrari, G., Garibotto, G., Acquarone, N., Robando, C. & Ghiggeri, G. M. (1982). Renal ammoniagenesis in an early stage of metabolic acidosis in man. Journal of Clinical Investigation 69, 240250.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Tizianello, A., De Ferrari, G., Garibotto, G. & Gurreri, G. (1978). Effects of chronic renal insufficiency and metabolic acidosis on glutamine metabolism in man. Clinical Science and Molecular Medicine 55, 391392.Google ScholarPubMed
Waterlow, J. C., Golden, M. H. N. & Garlick, P. J. (1978). Protein turnover in man measured with 15N: comparison of end-products and dose regimes. American Journal of Physiology 235, E165E174.Google ScholarPubMed
Welbourne, T. C. (1986). Effect of metabolic acidosis on hindquarter glutamine and alanine release. Metabolism 35, 614618.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
You have Access
1
Cited by

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

The effect of acidosis on the labelling of urinary ammonia during infusion of [amide-15N]glutamine in human subjects
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

The effect of acidosis on the labelling of urinary ammonia during infusion of [amide-15N]glutamine in human subjects
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

The effect of acidosis on the labelling of urinary ammonia during infusion of [amide-15N]glutamine in human subjects
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *