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Effects of lifelong intervention with an oligofructose-enriched inulin in rats on general health and lifespan

  • Pascale Rozan (a1), Amine Nejdi (a1), Sophie Hidalgo (a1), Jean-François Bisson (a1), Didier Desor (a2) and Michaël Messaoudi (a1)...
Abstract

Ageing is associated with changes in physiology and morphology; nutritional strategies to decrease morbidity and to prolong life are of high interest. The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of lifelong supplementation with an oligofructose-enriched inulin on morphological and biological markers and lifespan in male and female rats. Male and female rats, age 3 months, were randomised into two groups to receive either a diet with 10 % of an oligofructose-enriched inulin (Synergy1) or a standard diet (control) for 27 months. The rats were weighed every 2 weeks and their food intake was evaluated on four successive days every 4–6 weeks. Samples were taken at 12, 18 and 24 months of age. During the whole intervention period, male rats receiving Synergy1 (SYN1-M) displayed lower body weight, cholesterol and plasma triacylglycerolaemia compared with the controls (Cont-M). The survival rate at 24 months of age of SYN1-M rats was 35·3 % greater than that of Cont-M rats. In female rats, the Synergy1 supplementation (SYN1-F) group also reduced body weight, cholesterol and triacylglycerolaemia levels, but results were less consistent over the experiment. The survival rate at 24 months of age in SYN1-F rats was 33·3 % greater compared with that of the control (Cont-F) group. To conclude, lifelong intervention with Synergy1 improved biological markers during ageing and survival rate (lifespan) of rats.

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Corresponding author
*Corresponding author: Dr Pascale Rozan, fax +33 383 446 441, email prozan@etap-lab.com
References
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